Article here. Excerpt:

'In 2014, a white female student at the University of Findlay accused two black athletes of sexually assaulting her. The university expelled the two men—a basketball player and a football player—24 hours later, without bothering to interview witnesses who would have contradicted the accusation. According to the two men's lawsuit against Findlay, investigators didn't even interview the young woman.

In my original write-up of the lawsuit, I called it perhaps the most blatantly unfair Title IX case I had ever covered. (Title IX is the federal statute prohibiting sex-based discrimination in education.)

That dispute is still working its way through the courts. In the meantime, one of the young men—Alphonso Baity, now 23—was finally able to find a basketball program that would let him on the team: Duquesne University. That was quite an accomplishment; students expelled for sexual misconduct can have a tough time earning admission to another school, no matter how farcical the charges against them.

But Baity recently got some bad news. The National College Athletic Association won't let him play.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'There's a word that has become popular in feminist circles these days: "mansplaining." The word is a mashup of "man" and "explaining" and refers to men who condescendingly explain the facts of life to women. So, for example, if a man believes a woman doesn't understand directions and slowly repeats those directions to a woman, he's mansplaining and, therefore, guilty of cruelty and stupidity.

Well, feminists, it's time to stop "feministsplaining" sex to men.

The #MeToo movement has been good for America. It's good that women who have been sexually assaulted and abused are coming forward; it's good that we're finally having conversations about the nature of consent and the problems with a casual hookup culture that obfuscates sexual responsibility. But the #MeToo movement hasn't stopped there. Men are now being pilloried for the sin of taking women too literally -- of not reading women's minds.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Booker, who is black, told Nielsen that racism and violent white supremacism festers when people don't speak up about it, that he and other minority senators had faced death threats, and that Nielsen's "silence and amnesia is complicity."
...
Video clips of the exchange, which included Booker sharply cutting Nielsen off when she tried to respond, went viral on the Internet. Along with acclaim from supporters, Booker faced criticism, with some saying his outrage was feigned, something he learned from actors who contributed to his campaigns. Others said his treatment of Nielsen was akin to assault.
...
The RNC sent out in an email with pictures of Booker gesturing angrily and accusing him of spending 10 minutes "mansplaining" about immigration policy to the woman who runs the department responsible for it.

The release said that if a male Republican had done what Booker did to Nielsen, "there’d be a hashtag within minutes, campus protests across the country, and the topic-du-jour for celebrities at Hollywood’s next award show."'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'I’m apparently the victim of sexual assault. And if you’re a sexually active woman in the 21st century, chances are that you are, too.

That is what I learned from the “exposé” of Aziz Ansari published this weekend by the feminist website Babe — arguably the worst thing that has happened to the #MeToo movement since it began in October. It transforms what ought to be a movement for women’s empowerment into an emblem for female helplessness.
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Pu+ in other words: I am angry that you weren’t able to read my mind.

It is worth carefully studying Grace’s story. Encoded in it are new yet deeply retrograde ideas about what constitutes consent — and what constitutes sexual violence.

We are told by the reporter that Grace “says she used verbal and nonverbal cues to indicate how uncomfortable and distressed she was.” She adds that “whether Ansari didn’t notice Grace’s reticence or knowingly ignored it is impossible for her to say.” We are told that “he wouldn’t let her move away from him,” in the encounter.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'The New York Times now has a “gender editor” and “gender team,” created in the wake of the #MeToo movement to infuse feminist sensibility even further throughout the paper. The gender editor, Jessica Bennett, penned an op-ed last month that serves as a template for the hypocritical state of modern feminism. Bennett had unforced sex with a 30-year-old acquaintance when she was 19 because “saying ‘yes’ [was] easier than saying ‘no,’” as the op-ed’s title puts it. She allowed the encounter to proceed out of “some combination of fear (that I wasn’t as mature as he thought), shame (that I had let it get this far), and guilt (would I hurt his feelings?).” Naturally, Bennett attributes her passivity and embarrassment at that moment to “dangerously outdated gender norms.” It is the patriarchy, she claims, that makes “even seemingly straightforward ideas about sex—such as, you know, whether we want to engage in it or not—feel utterly complex.”

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It just came to me. Certain women/girls, probably feminists but not necessarily, may for whatever reasons seek to avoid contact with men/boys. They avoid starting conversations with men, eye contact, etc. They limit contact to just absolutely necessary interactions. And there is a greater chance such women will conclude quickly that something he says is unwanted/offensive/etc. It's better therefore for men to avoid initiating contact with such women. But how can you tell who are the "Buzz off, man" kind?

How about this: women who want minimal contact with men can pin a small red reflective disc to their shirt/blouse/etc. Red of course represents "stop", like a red traffic light. We call them Minimal Male Contact Badges", or MMCBs for short.

By "minimal," it is understood not to mean "No Contact" but instead necessary contact only. So for example if she needs the help of a male cop or fire-fighter, of course they can exchange words. If a male server attends her at a diner, it's understood he must talk to her. But unless he needs to convey necessary information to her or has a need to get same from her in particular, the MMCB acts as a *request* for minimal contact. Sporting one it should be noted creates no obligation on mens' parts to comply.

Now MANN readers, I ask for your opinions on this idea. Please comment.

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Article here. Excerpt:

'It seems that I am a "Bad Feminist." I can add that to the other things I've been accused of since 1972, such as climbing to fame up a pyramid of decapitated men's heads (a leftie journal), of being a dominatrix bent on the subjugation of men (a rightie one, complete with an illustration of me in leather boots and a whip) and of being an awful person who can annihilate – with her magic White Witch powers – anyone critical of her at Toronto dinner tables. I'm so scary! And now, it seems, I am conducting a War on Women, like the misogynistic, rape-enabling Bad Feminist that I am.
...
This structure – guilty because accused – has applied in many more episodes in human history than Salem. It tends to kick in during the "Terror and Virtue" phase of revolutions – something has gone wrong, and there must be a purge, as in the French Revolution, Stalin's purges in the USSR, the Red Guard period in China, the reign of the Generals in Argentina and the early days of the Iranian Revolution. The list is long and Left and Right have both indulged. Before "Terror and Virtue" is over, a great many have fallen by the wayside. Note that I am not saying that there are no traitors or whatever the target group may be; simply that in such times, the usual rules of evidence are bypassed.

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Article here. Excerpt:

'To call the downfall of Hollywood titan Harvey Weinstein precipitous feels like an understatement. On Thursday, The New York Times reported that the Miramax chief had quietly settled at least eight sexual harassment complaints over the years. They involved serious allegations that ranged from groping to demanding nude massages. On Sunday, after the mogul’s attempt at rehabilitation and damage control was undercut by new claims of abusive behavior, the Weinstein company fired its co-founder.

It’s a striking morality tale. But what is the moral?

In a climate in which both partisan politics and gender politics are already at fever pitches, responses to the Weinstein revelations have focused mainly on two themes: liberal hypocrisy on women’s issues and male abuse of women.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'For years, universities and funding organizations have attempted to address women’s underrepresentation among science faculty, whether by removing barriers to recruitment and retention or trying to dispel biases among employers and grant makers. Two newly announced programs take the less common, more contentious approach of affirmative action—offering positions or funding specifically for female investigators.

One program launched in 2017 in Australia, where the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) developed an initiative to fund more research by female scientists. Another is in Germany, where the Max Planck Society created a program to start in 2018 to increase the number of research groups led by women each year.

“The initiatives are very interesting—and bound to be controversial,” MIT biologist Nancy Hopkins writes in an email to The Scientist. “People will say there aren’t enough women who are as good as the great men of the Max Planck Institute. And for sure no one wants the institution to lower its standard—least of all would women want it to do so!”'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Men do bad things with shocking consistency — that's why we have words like manspreading, mansplaining, and hepeating.

But there's an endless list of other male flaws out there that are as yet unlabeled ... until now. Sort of.

The list below should help better prepare you for the next time you have to interact with a man. Use these words to properly — but probably not that easily — point out bad male behavior.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'No one is or should be defending abuse of power. It’s foul. I’m glad certain monsters have been toppled. (For the record, I routinely believe the women in specific cases. I believed Anita Hill, Paula Jones, Kathleen Willey, and Juanita Broaddrick and did so on the record.) But nuance, context, and specifics matter. The Deneuve letter rightly insisted: “Rape is a crime. But insistent or clumsy flirting is not a crime, nor is gallantry a chauvinist aggression.” The manifesto observed the censorious Victorianism about some of the rhetoric, and the public invasion of private matters. But the French signatories also worried about due process: “This expedited justice already has its victims, men prevented from practicing their profession as punishment, forced to resign, etc., while the only thing they did wrong was touching a knee, trying to steal a kiss, or speaking about ‘intimate’ things at a work dinner, or sending messages with sexual connotations to a woman whose feelings were not mutual.” South Park, as usual, was ahead of the curve. Its season finale last month portrayed an office romance between PC Principal and a new character, Strong Woman. And at the mere suggestion of an affair between them, everyone instantly projectile vomits in disgust. What other response could there be to the idea of a relationship between co-workers?'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'If you want to see misogyny – real, visceral, woman-shaming misogyny, the kind that views women as incapable of thinking for themselves, or as possessors of such foul thoughts that they shouldn’t think for themselves – look no further than #MeToo. Forget those tragic internet threads inhabited by men whose fury with women is one part concern about feminism and nine parts because they’ve never had sex; look, instead, at the thoroughly mainstream, celebrity-endorsed #MeToo movement whose fear of men is easily matched – outdone now, in fact – by its seething contempt for women who think for themselves.

Consider what has happened to Katie Roiphe over the past 48 hours. Roiphe is one of America’s most interesting essayists and authors, having come to public prominence with her precocious 1994 book The Morning After: Sex, Fear and Feminism and going on to write everything from cultural criticism to a book on famous writers’ dying hours. She is currently the target of a most extraordinary Twitterstorm – a furious, censorious rage not over something she has said, but over something people think she is going to say in a future issue of Harper’s. We’ve had precrime; this is precensorship, the violent-minded punishment of an author for what she might at some point utter.'

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Link here. From the interviewer's YouTube page desciption:

'Rogue Conservative - No idea is above scrutiny and every idea deserves it.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'University of Rochester President Joel Seligman announced his resignation Thursday, just hours after the release of a report on sexual misconduct on campus.

The news came late Thursday afternoon, just as his silence on the Mary Jo White report was becoming conspicuous. That report, which examined the university's response to sexual misconduct allegations in the Brain and Cognitive Sciences department, largely approved the role Seligman and his cabinet played in the affair.

His decision to resign, though, was made before the White report came out.

In an email to the campus, he wrote: "It is clear to me that the best interests of the University are best served with new leadership, and a fresh perspective to focus on healing our campus and moving us forward in a spirit of cooperation and unity."'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Democratic Whip Steny Hoyer (Md.) on Thursday blasted Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi's (D-Calif.) remarks about white men working on an immigration agreement as "offensive." 

“The five white guys I call them, you know," Pelosi said, referring to five bipartisan lawmakers, including Hoyer, leading efforts to salvage the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. All five of the male lawmakers are white.

"Are they going to open a hamburger stand next or what?" she said, referring to the popular fast food restaurant "Five Guys."

Hoyer pushed back against the remarks.

“That comment is offensive. I am committed to ensuring DREAMers are protected and I will welcome everyone to the table who wants to get this done,” he told Politico in a statement, using the nickname referring to recipients of the DACA program.'

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