Article here. Excerpt:

'A student found guilty by Cornell of sexually assaulting and retaliating against a female student could be back on campus in the fall because a judge temporarily barred the University from suspending him.

Cornell handed the male student a two-year suspension in May, and a University appeal panel upheld the punishment on Wednesday, leaving the student, who is in the Class of 2020 and is referred to as John Doe, with a notation of guilt on his transcript. The student sued Cornell the next day, arguing that the University departed from its own policies and that there was a lack of substantial evidence to find him responsible.

On Friday, Tompkins County Justice Eugene Faughnan temporarily stayed the suspension while he considers the merits of Doe’s case against Cornell.

Doe’s attorney, Alan Sash, said the judge recognized the immediacy of the case and acted quickly so that Doe could be back at school in time for the fall semester.

This suit is the second claim filed in less than four months alleging that Cornell did not act properly in a Title IX investigation.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'A female University of Southern California (USC) student is claiming that the school’s Title IX office threatened her for disavowing accusations of domestic violence.

Zoe Katz, the girlfriend of a male student whose college football career was derailed by a “rogue” Title IX office at the school, alleges that the university threatened her because she refused to say her boyfriend assaulted her. Title IX investigators insisted she must be a “battered” woman for refusing to comply, she says.
...
In a two-page statement provided toThe College Fix, Katz says that the inquiry consisted of “repeated interrogations” filled with “agendas, intimidation and falsehoods.”

She called the investigation “horrible and unjust,” and noted how Boermeester was suspended from the university even before he was interviewed by a Title IX investigator.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'ROBOTS ARE COMING for our jobs—but not all of our jobs. They’re coming, in ever increasing numbers, for a certain kind of work. For farm and factory labor. For construction. For haulage. In other words, blue-collar jobs traditionally done by men.

This is why automation is so much more than an economic problem. It is a cultural problem, an identity problem, and—critically—a gender problem. Millions of men around the world are staring into the lacquered teeth of obsolescence, terrified of losing not only their security but also their source of meaning and dignity in a world that tells them that if they’re not rich, they’d better be doing something quintessentially manly for money. Otherwise they’re about as much use as a wooden coach-and-four on the freeway.

There’s hope for mankind, but it’ll be a hard sell. The way we respond to automation will depend very much on what we decide it means to be a man, or a woman, in the awkward adolescence of the 21st century.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Women spend too much time on housework relative to men, new research suggests, and it's probably dragging on U.S. productivity.

That's the first finding in this week's economic research wrap, which also looks at changes in the way women have spent their days in recent years and summarizes studies on spillovers from central bank balance-sheet normalization. Check this column each Tuesday for new and topical research from around the world.

Women have less time for on-the-job labor because they spend more time doing housework than their male counterparts — so they miss out when they're working in fields that reward long hours, based on a new National Bureau for Economic Research study. Some women shy away from jobs in fields that require long workweeks, knowing they won't have the time: a 10 percent cut in free time for women reduces their share in high-hour occupations by about 14 percent relative to men, according to the researcher's model.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Accordingly, it has become every man’s job to prove they can be trusted, in each and every interaction, day by day and case by case. In part, because so many men have behaved poorly. And so, we prove our trustworthiness by foregoing physical touch completely in any context in which even the slightestdoubt about our intentions might arise. Which, sadly, is pretty much every context we encounter.

And where does this leave men? Physically and emotionally isolated. Cut off from the deeply human physical contact that is proven to reduce stress, encourage self esteem and create community. Instead, we walk in the vast crowds of our cities alone in a desert of disconnection. Starving for physical connection.

We crave touch. We are cut off from it. The result is touch isolation.'

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One woman's take on "Dunkirk" here. No surprise, really. To expect a feminist to appreciate the silence of men and resolute determination that spells the difference between victory and defeat, life and death, is a bit much to ask. In fact I'd've been surprised at anything other than this. Still, seeing at least some number of women devalue and dismiss the experiences of men at war does have this positive effect: it diminishes the reinforcing effect that women traditionally have had on men going willingly into mass violence events that cost them life, limb, and sanity. Anything that discourages that has some virtue, in its own way. Excerpt:

'But my main issue with Dunkirk is that it's so clearly designed for men to man-out over. And look, it's not like I need every movie to have "strong female leads." Wonder Woman can probably tide me over for at least a year, and I understand that this war was dominated by brave male soldiers. I get that. But the packaging of the film, the general vibe, and the tenor of the people applauding it just screams "men-only"—and specifically seems to cater to a certain type of very pretentious man who would love nothing more than to explain to me why I'm wrong about not liking it. If this movie were a dating profile pic, it would be a swole guy at the gym who also goes to Harvard. If it was a drink it would be Stumptown coffee. If it was one of your friends, it would be the one who starts his sentences with "I get what you're saying, but..."'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'This notion that traditional male stoicism constitutes an “outmoded caricature of manhood” is a constant refrain in discussions of masculinity today. The cultural elites like the editors and contributors of Vanity Fair scorn that stereotype. The new ideal they seem to be promoting in its stead is a man narcissistically absorbed in exploring his own feelings, a man neutered of the outward-looking drive for achievement and adventure, and yes, even the capacity for violence that are part of his nature.

There is a reason that men traditionally are more emotionally reserved than women: throughout history men have been the providers and protectors, the hunters and warriors, the builders and trailblazers, and those duties demand no small measure of emotional toughness and restraint. That is no less true of life in today’s urban jungle.

In fact, at least one recent study demonstrates that emotionality may protect women from stress but does not protect men from it. Men, the study concludes, best combat stress through self-control. And frankly, no matter how loudly a minority of voices in the culture declare otherwise, most women don’t want a man who needs to be cuddled every night after work to keep it together. Women want a husband and a father for their children whom they can count on to be a pillar of strength and resilience in times of stress, emergency, and danger.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'In a series of meetings earlier this month, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos signaled strong disagreement with the Obama administration’s aggressive erosion of due process protections for college students accused of sexual assault. While deploring the horrors of the offense, DeVos added that “a system without due process protections … serves no one.”

This was a welcome change from the decrees issued by the Obama-era Office for Civil Rights (OCR), which had told colleges to avoid any due process safeguards that would “restrict or unnecessarily delay the protections provided by Title IX” to accusers. Surveying the damage to fundamental fairness from the Obama-era policies, a recent study by UCLA professor John Villasenor concluded that an innocent student has as much as a 1-in-3 chance of being found guilty by today’s campus sexual assault tribunals.
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The Obama policy proceeded from the counterfactual claim that sex crimes — which are no doubt a serious problem — were sweeping through the nation’s campuses like an epidemic. (In fact the number declined dramatically between 1997 and 2013.) With vocal support from President Obama and Vice President Biden, OCR used this myth to reinterpret the Title IX, the statute barring sex discrimination at schools that receive federal funds. The Obama-era OCR ordered universities to use the lowest possible standard of proof (preponderance of evidence, or 50.01%) and allow accusers to appeal not-guilty findings. It also discouraged colleges from allowing cross-examination of accusing students; and urged institutions to deny accused students any right to a hearing by giving all power to a single bureaucrat to act as investigator, prosecutor, judge and jury.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'National Public Radio isn’t interested in fair reporting when it comes to sexual assault.

That’s made plain by a segment on the “restorative justice” approach to campus sexual assault that aired Tuesday afternoon on All Things Considered, which bafflingly deprived its audience the most newsworthy trait of one of its interviewees.

Reporter Tovia Smith quotes as a “survivor” the Columbia University graduate Emma Sulkowicz, who lost her rape case against fellow student Paul Nungesser in a campus adjudication based on the extremely low “more likely than not” evidence standard.

Sulkowicz and her activist friends harassed Nungesser, a foreign student, for years through her “Carry that Weight” art project, in which she pledged to lug a mattress around campus until Columbia punished Nungesser, whom it had explicitly exonerated of any wrongdoing.

She lugged the mattress right on the graduation stage in explicit violation of Columbia graduation protocol and received academic credit for the project – factors that certainly played into Columbia’s recent payoff of Nungesser to drop his gender-discrimination lawsuit against the school.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Any woman could tell you that a good man is hard to find. Some men don't measure up to what a woman wants them to be. Some are coarse, profane, mean and other bad things.

But most men are none of those things, and even bad apples in the right hands can become an appetizing applesauce. Besides, as almost any woman would ask, where's the alternative?

Nevertheless, there's a growing campaign on the left to denigrate men and something called "toxic masculinity" that is cited as a menace to women, the republic, mankind and all the ships at sea. A growing number of colleges and universities, which lately have become a source of a lot of toxic things themselves, are force-feeding young men the radical-feminist nonsense that "masculinity" is at the root of everything bad.'

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Link here. Excerpt:

'WOMEN IN ENGINEERING
SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Saab Australia recognises our success comes from our highly valued people. Our people are important to us as we continually strive to enhance the employee experience as part of our ‘Employer of Choice’ program.

In support of this, Saab Australia offers a ‘Women in Engineering’ Scholarship which is designed to encourage and empower women entering the Engineering industry within the fields of:

Electrical/Electronics
Computer Systems
Software
Mechatronics'

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Article here. OP submitted comments. I placed them as the first comment for this item. Excerpt:

'Women and nonwhite men don’t have it quite as easy.

If boys will be boys, then girls must be grown-ups, whose job it is to protect men from their worst impulses. Witness every administrative body, from middle school to Congress, that has decided that it’s easier and more culturally acceptable to police girls’ and women’s clothing than it is boys’ behavior.

Should one of these fine young fellows slip — inflamed, perhaps, by one bare shoulder too many — there’s probably a woman to blame, and it’s his punishment, not his crime, that becomes the tragedy.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Emma Sulkowicz, the infamous "mattress girl," surfaced this week on National Public Radio talking about her efforts to get a serial predator, "a sadist in the truest meaning of that word," off the Columbia University campus.

Sulkowicz, referred to in the story as an "activist and survivor," mentioned that the subject of her efforts won a settlement from Columbia this month in a lawsuit charging that Sulkowicz's activism amounted to gender-based harassment.

When a disciplinary hearing in late 2013 cleared Paul Nungesser of charges that he raped Sulkowicz, she refused to accept the outcome. Her protest—which included carrying a mattress on campus for most of her senior year to represent the "weight" of her victimization—made her the heroine of a new feminist revolution. It also made him the campus pariah after she outed him as her alleged rapist.

While the terms of the settlement are unknown, Columbia issued a statement effectively reaffirming Nungesser's exoneration. This was an important victory not just for Nungesser and his family, but for those who have argued the war on campus rape, however worthy its goals, has often trampled on the innocent.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'A Texas teen who ran into a church half-naked saying she was raped was indicted for what turned out to be an elaborate hoax.

Breana Harmon, 19, was charged Wednesday with two counts of tampering with physical evidence and two counts of tampering with a government record, which are felonies, according to the Herald Democrat.

Officials said that teen, who also uses the last name Talbott, made a false report to police on March 8 claiming to have been abducted and gang-raped behind a church in Denison, Texas.

The teen turned up at the local church covered in blood and wearing only a shirt, bra and underwear. She allegedly told parishioners that black men had taken her into the woods and raped her.

Harmon, then 18, told police that she was raped by two black men in ski masks while a third pinned her down. She claimed that the suspects had kidnapped near her car in an apartment parking lot, news station KXII reported.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'“When a woman starts speaking at the table – don’t talk over her, listen to her, acknowledge the points that she’s made and give her credit for the ideas and don’t steal them.”

She said there’s an over-representation of male candidates while female talent is wasted because the Liberal Party is focused on “control and power and not good government”.

“It happens because the male factional leaders pulling the strings are focused only on who they think will be good puppets that they can control at the end of their strings,” she said.

“Not who will bring the best reliability and representation to their electorate.'

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