Article here. Excerpt:

'Therese Gunn admitted Friday that she’d had a sexual relationship with one of her students. The 54-year-old, now-former orchestra teacher said she couldn’t believe she’d done it, and that she’d made a poor decision, and that she was sorry.

She then changed course, however briefly, and blamed her victim — claiming the then-17-year-old boy had coerced her into the relationship that developed at South Gwinnett High School.

“He did,” Gunn said in front of Judge Warren Davis. “He was like a used car salesman.”

Davis didn’t care for that argument, nor did prosecutor Karen West. And after Gunn entered her guilty plea to a single count of sexual assault by a person with supervisory authority, the judge sentenced her to serve just 90 days in prison.

The remainder of her 10-year sentence will be spent on probation.

“I don’t find that you're the kind of person that needs to be warehoused for years,” Davis said. “We get those cases and we get them out of society as long as we can. You're not one of those. But you clearly betrayed the trust that you had of parents, this parent, putting this child in your care.”'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Against this stark backdrop, a professor at the University of British Columbia has highlighted a different statistic from the crisis: in 2016, of the 935 fatal overdoses in the province, 80% were men.

Research that shows men are more likely to use illicit drugs, so it is perhaps logical that they are more likely to overdose. But the clinical psychologist Dan Bilsker argues that the figure suggests a relationship between the crisis and masculinity – one that may offer clues as to why the death toll continues to rise, and where the solutions might lie.

“I think we haven’t really thought deeply or well about who men are, about what the pressures on them are, what we need them to be,” he said.

Bilsker has spent years studying men’s psychological health, delving into why men live an average of four to six years less than women and are more likely to kill themselves. In some ways, the opioid crisis stems from the same tangled roots, he said. And as with many other health issues, its singular interaction with gender has been largely overlooked.
...
Bilsker believes the government’s response would be different if those dying were 80% women. “I suspect there would be more groups – more people actively involved in raising public awareness – who would speak up and engender a greater sense of this being an important issue,” he said.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Alberto Del Rio faces a police probe after the incident at an airport in the US state of Florida.

It's claimed that he and his "female companion" argued and then there was an altercation.

Police told TMZ that Del Rio was not arrested or charged but is under investigation.'

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Paige Shared Her Side Of The Alberto Del Rio Airport Incident

'“Alberto didn’t want me to say [the] full story because he didn’t want people to know that I threw a drink on him. But the full story is:

“I had a phone call saying my uncle is in a bad way. I’m crying outside the restaurant. I go in, Alberto is hugging me. I’m a little sensitive and we start bickering about something so small. I say I’m leaving and he says something that I won’t write on here but it wasn’t nice and I, even though I shouldn’t have done it. I threw a drink in his face because I was so angry. Again. Shouldn’t have done it. It was in front of a lot of people.

“I walk out. He follows me a few seconds later and gets the cops and security, and a crazy lady decides to leave whatever she’s doing to follow us and invade our privacy in the completely low way only low life people would do.

“Anyways. It was ME who was being held for battery charges because I threw a drink on him. No. He never touched me and no I never hit him with a glass three times like the internet in all their glory is making out. It’s completely ridiculous how one story can spiral out of control. Oh and guess what internet. He smelt like beer BECAUSE I THREW A BEER ON HIM. Nothing more. Nothing less. No one got arrested. There’s no mug shots. There’s no charges. Nothing.

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Article here. Excerpt:

'The first time Paul Nungesser filed a lawsuit over the damage to his reputation from Columbia University’s handling of sexual-assault allegations, the school managed to get it tossed out of court. The second lawsuit filed by Nungesser, based on sex-based discrimination over his male gender even after having been exonerated, apparently hit closer to the mark. Columbia announced that it has settled the suit — and says it will now change its policies to prevent it from happening again:
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It’s worth noting that this statement goes a little beyond the usual corporate “we admit nothing but just want to move on” message. As reported by the school’s newspaper, Columbia offers some recognition of fault in this complaint, suggesting that it has some responsibility for the damage done to Nungesser’s reputation from Emma Sulkowicz’ bizarre protest stunts and the national media attention it received. The promise to change its policies are the most significant of these admissions, which implies that the existing policies at the time contributed significantly to the damage.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'In a recent academic journal article, two feminist professors claim that citing sources in scholarly articles contributes to “white heteromasculinity.”

Rutgers University professor Carrie Mott and University of Waterloo professor Daniel Cockayne advance the claim in an article published last month in the Feminist Journal of Geography, but also suggest that citation can serve as “a feminist and anti-racist technology of resistance” if references are chosen with the explicit intent of promoting “those authors and voices we want to carry forward.”

Mott and Cockayne say citation practices are an issue of scholarly concern because whether a professor's work is cited by other scholars has strong implications for hiring, promotion, tenure, and how “certain voices are represented over others” in academia.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Editors with Twitchy don’t typically write in the first person, but I’m sorry folks, I have to write this one in the first person because I have a son. A wonderful, amazing, funny, sensitive son who turned 10 a couple of weeks ago, and I’m afraid for him.

I’m afraid for all little boys growing up in a world where garbage like THIS is somehow a narrative a whole movement stands behind. That a mother could write such horrible filth about her own sons to push a hateful, awful narrative … that she could knowingly hurt him, hurts me.

Hurts all mothers.
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Moms out there with sons, we have so much work to do to protect our boys and make sure they are safe in a world where this sort of hate speech is not only acceptable, but nurtured and supported.

Men are not inherently evil, they are not inherently dangerous and they are not LESS THAN. Equality is about being equal, not superior, and not shaming the other sex, and until third wave feminists figure this out, they’ll never really be equal.

And feminism tells us MEN are the problem. Shameful.'

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Link here. Excerpt:

'The Kunga Stopping Violence Program, an initiative of the Central Australian Aboriginal Legal Aid Service (CAALAS), is the only program in Central Australia that works with women while they are in prison, and then for 12 months after their release to try to break cycles of violence.

"I'd say 100 per cent of our women have had very traumatic experiences in their life," program co-manager Miriam Bevis said.

"And so their crimes have just come out of the environment that they've been exposed to."
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The number of women entering the criminal justice system has increased at an unprecedented rate.

A May 2017 report by the Human Rights Law Centre published statistics that revealed in the 25 years since the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in custody, the rate of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women being imprisoned grew by 148 per cent.

Northern Territory Minister for Families Dale Wakefield stopped short of describing the issue of female incarceration as a crisis.

But said rehabilitation services in and out of prisons had been focused on men for too long.

"It's something that we are looking at, and something that I know the Corrections Minister is very passionate about, and will continue to do that work," Ms Wakefield said.

Ms Wakefield also said an upcoming trial of an Alice Springs-based specialised domestic violence court would be aimed at shifting the power imbalance between men and women in the correctional system.

"Part of this would be having a specialist domestic violence list which would mean matters are dealt with in a more effective and timely way," she said.

"As well as making sure that everyone involved in that court has specialist training to understand the power dynamics of family and domestic violence.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'The letters have come in to her office by the hundreds, heartfelt missives from college students, mostly men, who had been accused of rape or sexual assault. Some had lost scholarships. Some had been expelled. A mother stumbled upon her son trying to take his own life, recalled Candice E. Jackson, the top civil rights official at the Department of Education.

“Listening to her talk about walking in and finding him in the middle of trying to kill himself because his life and his future were gone, and he was forever branded a rapist — that’s haunting,” said Ms. Jackson, describing a meeting with the mother of a young man who had been accused of sexual assault three months after his first sexual encounter.

The young man, who maintained he was innocent, had hoped to become a doctor.

In recent years, on campus after campus, from the University of Virginia to Columbia University, from Duke to Stanford, higher education has been roiled by high-profile cases of sexual assault accusations. Now Education Secretary Betsy DeVos is stepping into that maelstrom. On Thursday, she will meet in private with women who say they were assaulted, accused students and their families, advocates for both sides and higher education officials, the first step in a contentious effort to re-examine policies of President Barack Obama, who made expansive use of his powers to investigate the way universities and colleges handle sexual violence.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand is furious that the Trump Department of Education is pulling back from Obama-era demands that colleges junk due process in the name of fighting sexual assault.

She and 30 other congressional Democrats last week wrote Education Secretary Betsy DeVos that they’re “extraordinarily disappointed and alarmed” over actions to diminish “enforcement of federal civil rights law.” Specifically, they complain that DeVos has hired staff hostile to the department’s 2011 guidance on how schools should approach campus sexual assault.

They’re absolutely right about the hostility: DeVos and her team are ending the jihad by the department’s Office for Civil Rights, which was launched at the behest of extremists like Gillibrand and her colleagues.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'A Pennsylvania liberal arts school has been chastened by its legal brush with a student it expelled after allegedly denying him “even minimal due process protections” in a campus sexual-assault investigation.

The Meadville Tribune reports that Allegheny College settled the federal civil-rights lawsuit brought by “John Doe” in February. It had already been sent to mediation by the judge and a mediation result reached in May.

Doe alleged that Allegheny consistently kept him in the dark throughout the 2015 proceeding initiated by “Jane,” tilted it against him at every turn and gave him no “meaningful appeal” of his expulsion, the most severe sanction a college can impose:'

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Article here. Home detention? If this had been a man who had done this, he'd be locked up. And airlines are worried about seating men next to single women and children. Excerpt:

'An Oregon woman who molested another passenger aboard an Alaska Airlines flight last year was sentenced Monday to eight months of home detention and three years of probation.

Heidi McKinney, 27, of Banks didn't speak in federal court during her sentencing but wrote a letter of apology to the young woman who she verbally and physically abused.

The encounter occurred on May 8, 2016, when a 19-year-old woman boarded a flight in Las Vegas to return to her home in Portland. She said a "rowdy" woman later identified as McKinney tried to take a seat in her row and inappropriately placed her hands on her chest.

McKinney, who was traveling with her sister-in-law, insisted on taking multiple photos of the 19-year-old woman despite her protestations. After the plane took off, McKinney tried to lure the 19-year-old into drinking alcohol that she had smuggled onto the plane. When the 19-year-old refused, McKinney threw the bottle onto the victim's lap, according to prosecutors.

McKinney subjected the 19-year-old to lewd and demeaning taunts and physical touching, including licking the 19-year-old's ear, placing her hand on the victim's crotch several times and attempting to force the 19-year-old to touch McKinney's breasts, Assistant U.S. Attorney Ravi Sinha wrote in a sentencing memo.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'The Dignity for Incarcerated Women Act would make a series of common-sense reforms to how the federal prison system treats incarcerated women in order to reduce the negative impact incarceration has on the family members of women behind bars, especially their children, and better prepare incarcerated women to return to their communities.

"For too long issues affecting women have been left out of the conversation about prison reform - that ends today," Senator Booker said. "A majority of women behind bars are mothers and nearly three-quarters have been the victims of trauma or abuse. We must take these circumstances into account when we place women in prison facilities. That means common-sense changes such as considering where an incarcerated mother's kids live when assigning a prison location, providing phone calls to home free of charge for primary caretakers, and banning the shackling and solitary confinement of pregnant women."

"The Dignity for Women Act starts to change our country's approach to helping women in prison. It's about living up to our nation's commitment that every person is treated with dignity and has a real opportunity to build a future," Senator Warren said. "This legislation will help ensure that incarcerated women have the tools, resources, and services they need to maintain and strengthen ties to their families and to go back into their communities with the skills they need to be successful."'

Also see: Booker: Incarcerated moms should be placed closer to their kids

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Article here. Excerpt:

'The Supreme Court of Canada will explain Friday why it threw out sexual assault charges against a woman who had sex with the 14-year-old friend of her son.

In May, justices ruled that Saskatchewan resident Barbara George, who was 35 at the time of the sexual encounter, should not face a new trial for sexual interference and sexual assault. It will present written reasons for that decision.

The crux of the case is around age of consent, and a section of the Criminal Code that requires an adult to take "reasonable steps" to determine the age of a person before engaging in sex with them.

George was acquitted of the charges because the trial judge found the sexual activity was "factually consensual" — that she honestly believed the boy was at least 16, and there was reasonable doubt she had not taken all reasonable steps to determine the age of "C.D.," whose full name is protected by a publication ban.

He was attending a party at her home the night of the encounter.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'College attorneys were bowled over with bliss when Trump administration officials promised to pull back on the open-ended, guilty-until-proven-innocent investigations their predecessors led – investigations that incentivized schools to punish accused students regardless of evidence.

They shouldn’t get too excited yet.

Due process for accused students is still a cause with a vanishingly small constituency, as evidenced by areport released last month by a New Jersey campus sexual-assault task force appointed by Republican Gov. Chris Christie.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) and Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) urged Secretary of Education Betsy Devos on Wednesday to reverse a decision her department made last month that would impede its ability to investigate campus sexual assault.

The head of the Department of Education’s civil rights office, Candice Jackson, issued a memo in June instructing staff to scale back their investigations of systemic civil rights issues at public schools and universities, including the mishandling of sexual assault cases. Whereas the Obama administration required staff to review past information along with each complaint to identify potential systemic problems with how campuses handle rape cases or discriminate against certain classes of victims, the Trump administration will scrap those rules and investigate each complaint at face value.

Gillibrand and McCaskill, the latter of whom is a former prosecutor, are concerned that if the administration handles complaints on a case-by-case basis, rather than considering a school’s broader history of dealing with sexual assault, it will allow schools to continue to sweep the problem under the rug rather then forcing them to overhaul their policies. Title IX federal law requires the government to protect women at publicly funded schools from sex discrimination, including assault and harassment.'

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