Story here. Seriously. I mean, like, seriously. Guilty, Not Guilty, Unproven, and Stupid. These are the four verdicts I'd like to see available in our courts. In this case I am not sure exactly how I'd rule. Guilty? Not Guilty By Reason of Stupidity? Or Guilty And Stupid? That last fits. Excerpt:

'An Arizona woman stabbed her boyfriend with a pair of scissors after he declined her request to engage in a threesome with a woman that the alleged assailant had met at a local dog park, police charge.

According to cops, Teresa Gillard, 42, is facing felony aggravated assault and disorderly conduct charges stemming from a confrontation earlier this month at a residence in Lake Havasu City that she shares with the victim.
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As detailed in a police report, Gillard told cops that she wanted to invite her new female acquaintance over for a threesome, which she and the victim “have always talked about doing.” But, Gillard added, her boyfriend “did not want to have a threesome because he wasn’t feeling well.”

The couple--who have dated, on and off, since 2008--began quarreling after the threesome proposal was rejected by the victim. A verbal argument between the pair eventually turned physical, investigators allege.

As first reported in Today’s News-Herald, as the dispute escalated, Gillard allegedly stabbed the victim several times in the arm and abdomen with a pair of scissors. The man, cops say, suffered only minor lacerations during the January 12 fracas.
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Cops responded to the Lake Havasu City home after Gillard called 911 to claim that she had been beaten up by the victim. The man, however, was not charged by police.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'In India, where crimes against women are rampant, a female activist and documentary filmmaker stands out for being a rare voice for abused men. The BBC's Geeta Pandey in Delhi profiles Deepika Narayan Bhardwaj as part of a series on the Asian women likely to make the news in 2017.

India regularly gets hauled over the coals for its shabby treatment of women. And rightly so.

Every 15 minutes a rape is recorded, every five minutes an incident of domestic violence is reported, a bride is killed for dowry every 69 minutes and every year hundreds of thousands of female foetuses are aborted and infant girls are killed, leading to an appallingly skewed gender ratio. Girls and women also have to battle lifelong discrimination, prejudice, violence and neglect.

In a climate like that, 31-year-old Deepika Narayan Bhardwaj knows she sticks out like a sore thumb, but she has some questions that are reasonable enough: "Are men not vulnerable? Do they not face discrimination? Can they not be victims?"

And she goes on to add: "Just as you don't have to be a woman to fight for women, similarly, you don't have to be a man to fight for men. I don't talk about atrocities against women because there are millions who are talking about it."'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Two Rhode Island School of Design students were kicked out of Brown University’s gym for wearing midriff-baring gear, and now they’re insisting that the dress code is sexist — even though the rules are exactly the same for men as they are for women.
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The Herald reports that although both women consider the policy to be “sexist and discriminatory towards women,” school officials have insisted that that’s not the case. In fact, Nelson Fitness Center manager Jason Bishoff told the publication that if an employee really did tell Karayiannis that the reason she had to cover up was to avoid making other people uncomfortable, then that employee simply did not understand the real reason for the rule — which he said is “to reduce skin contact with workout equipment.”

“We don’t want anybody to feel that this is targeted at them,” Bishoff said. “These rules apply to all genders, all ages, all populations.”

That’s right: According to Bishoff, the reason behind the rules is not to maximize the power of the patriarchy, but to minimize the amount of sweaty, germ-covered skin that will be touching the equipment. Still, both Dimitroff and Karayiannis insist that — gender-neutral or not — the rules are clearly rooted in a misogynistic desire to police women’s bodies.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'When it comes to dealing with sexism, women are being more outspoken than ever before. Whether you tweet out a shady experience for all your followers to read or call into the mansplaining hotline to report an incident, now is very much a “see something, say something” sort of era. If you want to know more about where sexism is happening and do your part to raise awareness, there’s a new app you need to DL. Introducing: Whistle.

Whistle is a newly released app for iPhone (and soon Android) users that enables women to anonymously identify and call out sexism over the course of their daily lives — not just at work, but while they are out, exercising, shopping and more.

How it works is super simple: Open up the app on your phone and you’ll be prompted to either “whistle” or see what women have been whistling about most recently or nearby. If you decide to send out a whistle, you first place it in one of six categories: work, public, home, school, online or in the media. From there you’ll select what type of sexism you’re experiencing. Of the 10 choices, you can pick from options like “boys club behavior” and “mansplaining.” After that, you’ll have 200 characters to explain what happened. Then, send it out to the network where other members can view and comment. If you don’t have anything to report but you want to see what sort of sexist acts are happening in your area, you can check out the “nearby” tab to view whistles that have recently been sent out in your area.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'The contentious confirmation hearing of Betsy DeVos, President Trump’s nominee for Education secretary, revealed just how difficult it will be to restore a degree of fairness in how the nation’s colleges and universities handle sexual assault allegations.

Even before the hearing commenced, Democratic senators Patty Murray of Washington and Bob Casey of Pennsylvania issued a letter wildly describing campus sexual assault as “affecting millions of college students.” (According the most recent federal Clery Act data, from 2014, there were 5,178 rape reports on campus that year.) The senators demanded the new administration retain guilt-presuming policies adopted in April 2011 by the Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR).

OCR has forced thousands of universities to change their procedures in sex cases, in each case increasing the chances of a guilty finding. These procedures include the lowest possible burden of proof (a 50.01% probability) ; a virtual ban on meaningful cross-examination, long seen by the Supreme Court as the law’s best truth-finding tool; letting accusers appeal not guilty findings, a form of double jeopardy; a process so rushed that many accused students lack time to prepare a defense; and “interim” punishments before any investigation.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'As the Trump administration begins its term in office, college leaders remain unsure about how the new White House will regulate institutions' approaches to campus sexual assault. A briefing Wednesday on Capitol Hill reflected that anxiety, with college presidents calling on institutions to continue the Obama administration’s increased focus on protecting students while urging the Trump administration to provide more clarity and to take a less adversarial stance.

“My hope is that whatever Congress or the administration does in terms of peeling back federal regulations, that the universities in this country do not step away from this issue,” said Diane Harrison, president of California State University, Northridge. “There are rumors that they’re going to lessen what we have to do. So we are potentially going to need to be far more assertive and far more vocal.”
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College presidents at Wednesday’s briefing were in agreement that they would continue to use the preponderance of evidence standard, even if the 2011 guidance were to be reversed. The majority of colleges were already using the standard prior to the Dear Colleague letter. Alisa White, president of Austin Peay State University, in Tennessee, said the lower standard is appropriate because a campus disciplinary decision does not involve “a loss of liberty.”

“I think the preponderance of the evidence standard should be one that would stand,” White said, while adding that colleges should not rush to judgment on a student’s culpability. “It’s important to us and will be important to us regardless of what guidance and policies change.”

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Article here. Excerpt:

'It seems that feminism has taken a much more intense pendulum swing in a direction that means that I no longer feel comfortable calling myself a feminist. It’s gotten that bad. We have various feminists now calling for “the end of the patriarchy” and some others still are saying in varying states of hysteria: “I hate men!”

Many of us look at these extremes and think it’s only a few who feel this way, but tragically that side of extreme male-hating feminism is on the rise and has been for some time. It is no longer about equal pay, equal opportunity, respect and equal rights. It is now about “women first” and screw the men (not in the good way!)

A video went viral recently featuring a woman, Jenny McDermott, stating “kill all male babies.” I actually feel sorry for her.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Due process protections for the accused in campus cases alleging sexual assault have been under attack for decades. In the guise of enforcing Title IX—a 1972 federal law prohibiting educational institutions that receive federal funds from discriminating on the basis of sex—the Obama administration intensified the attack.

Restoring due process on campuses does not seem to be a top priority for President Trump and congressional Republicans. If they wish to uphold the rule of law—for men and for women—it should be.

Sexual assault is a grave crime. It ought to be promptly reported to the police. Perpetrators should be punished to the full extent of the law. But stripping the accused of due process rights—shared with those accused of murder, assault and battery, and other violent crimes—violates the promise of equality under the law and undermines the most effective means available for pursuing the truth about claims of serious criminal wrongdoing.

University administrators and professors, politicians, and many journalists who write about this issue believe that an allegedly pervasive college “rape culture” justifies university authorities taking the law into their own hands and, in righteous pursuit of the monsters roaming our campuses, sweeping the innocent away with the guilty.'

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Article here. Wisconsin Public Radio published an article about an interview with Warren Farrell. They talk a lot about MRAs as "misogynists" etc., but at least Warren is able to give a more reasonable perspective. Excerpt:

'Warren Farrell, a prominent men’s rights activist, is often cited in online forums where men complain about their legal and cultural disempowerment.

Farrell’s 1993 book "The Myth of Male Power" is considered the guiding text for these aggrieved men, a kind of male counterpart to Betty Friedan’s 1963 "The Feminine Mystique."

Parts of the men’s movement are filled with anti-feminist diatribes and denunciations against women seen as manipulative and emasculating. So it may come as a surprise to meet Farrell, a soft-spoken man in his early seventies who once worked closely with Gloria Steinem, a prominent women's rights activist.

Farrell is aware of the misogyny and violent rhetoric that ripples through the men’s rights movement, but he said there’s tremendous pain beneath this anger, pain we must acknowledge to draw out the venom of toxic masculinity from our culture. ​​​​'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Ritual circumcision is a common practice for Jews and Muslims around the world. It is a legacy of God’s commandment to Abraham to circumcise his penis as a sign of their special bond, as chronicled in the Book of Genesis, and it persists as a kind of tribal marking.

In America, even irreligious Jews still embrace this initiation rite. Some blame peer pressure: “I didn’t want him to look weird,” my brother-in-law explained about his newborn son. Others take comfort in the fact that this tradition has also been blessed by the American medical establishment. Neonatal circumcision has been the most common surgery in America for over a century. Nearly six out of ten newborns are released from hospitals foreskin-free. The practice is so widespread, in fact, that one study of 90 active American medical textbooks and models found that less than a third featured a penis with foreskin intact.
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Because male circumcision is so common in the states, few Americans realize how rare it is most everywhere else. The practice has fallen by the wayside in Australia, Canada, Britain and New Zealand, and fewer than one-fifth of all male Europeans are circumcised. In December, the Danish Medical Association recommended ending the practice for boys, arguing that because it permanently alters the body it should be “an informed, personal choice” that young men make for themselves.

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Article here. Excerpt:

'How much of the failure to grasp current controversies over campus Title IX investigations come from seeing two sides even though they are demanding similar measures? Many from both camps, seemingly in frustration, suggest all campus Title IX investigations should be delegated to local police and prosecutors. That approach is not consistent with Title IX, but support for it suggests concerns with the current tools for addressing on-campus sexual violence.

The criminal justice system gives both victims and defendants lots of information about what is going to happen, when and why, what will be required of them and what protections will be afforded to them. Local police and prosecutors are bound by centuries of common law, codified in a relatively simple format, and must act in very consistent and predictable ways. Attempts to graft portions of criminal law into a campus Title IX jurisprudence come from a desire that all parties have access to a fair, predictable and open system. Although a wholesale grafting of criminal law and procedure into Title IX proceedings is inappropriate given the very serious differences in context, all students deserve reliable procedures consistent with due process.'

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Good article on gaslighting here. I read it and realized this is modern feminism's playbook. Excerpt:

'Gaslighting is a tactic of behavior in which a person or entity, in order to gain more power, makes a victim question their reality. It works a lot better than you may think. Anyone is susceptible to gaslighting. It is a common technique of abusers, dictators, narcissists, and cult leaders. It is done slowly, so the victim doesn't realize how much they've been brainwashed. In the movie Gaslight (1944), a man manipulates his wife to the point where she thinks she is losing her mind.

People that gaslight use the following techniques:

1. They tell you blatant lies.
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2. They deny they ever said something, even though you have proof.
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3. They use what is near and dear to you as ammunition.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'It was the lynching that outraged African Americans, spurred the civil rights movement and etched the victim’s name in history: Emmett Till.

The 14-year-old Chicagoan was visiting relatives in the cotton country of the Mississippi delta on 24 August 1955 when he allegedly wolf-whistled at a white woman.

Three days later his body was found in the Tallahatchie river. Till had a bullet hole in the head, an eye gouged out and other wounds. The murderers had wrapped barbed wire around his neck and weighted him down with a cotton gin fan.

It was a ghastly crime that changed the United States but the woman at the center of it, Carolyn Bryant, long remained an enigma.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Buckle in everyone, we’re going for a rocky ride on the social justice roller coaster.

A few months ago, Buzzfeed released a video called: “Women Try Manspreading for a Week.” I’ve never been a huge fan of Buzzfeed, but this video has scraped the bottom of the barrel of petty complaints.

In the video, several women explain what manspreading is—basically men spreading their legs into a large V-shape when they’re sitting—and then try doing it for a week themselves. Apparently, these women think that men should sit more like women tend to, with their legs closed. They think that men take up too much space when they sit down in crowded places like city busses.

Some of them do. I’m 100 percent aware that there are some jerks out there that sit in an obnoxious position and take up more room than necessary when there are other people looking for a seat. There are even people that will lay down across two to three bus seats. Most of the time, however, men just sit with their legs apart because it’s the most comfortable way for them to sit. In the words of my brother, “It’s uncomfortable to sit that way [with your legs closed].” It’s not rocket science to figure out why.

The women in this video don’t really care about that, but they certainly care about the amount of space that they think they are allowed to have on busses and the like. No one ever told these women that they aren’t allowed to take up more than one seat on a bus, so the fact that this is an assumed rule is ridiculous.
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This manspreading idea is taking the brilliant movement of feminism too far. Bringing justice to victims of sexual harassment and assault is an important feminist issue. Equal career opportunities for both men and women are an important feminist issue. Manspreading is just whining that is being labeled as a feminist issue.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'The term 'toxic masculinity' has crept into the lexicon in the past 12 months, having appeared in mainstream news articles, popular feminist blogs and, as of November, the crowd-sourced online repository of slang words, Urban Dictionary.

Generally used to denote how some aspects of masculinity — such as entitlement, homophobia and sexual aggressiveness — can harm women and families and cripple men's own health, toxic masculinity, at its most extreme edges, has been linked with acts of violence like mass shootings and university campus sexual assault.

(For this reason, some US colleges have recently introduced 'toxic masculinity' courses, in which male students can reflect on topics like rape culture, machismo and pornography.)
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And at the recent Women's March on Washington, a rally for which hundreds of thousands of demonstrators gathered to express their concern that women's and other minority groups' rights will be eroded under President Trump, many carried placards emblazoned with references to 'toxic masculinity'.

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