Trailer here. Description:

'Women Against Paternity Fraud, a 501(c)(3) non-profit educational and advocacy organization, is proud to announce the upcoming release of our video, "The Hidden Side of Paternity Fraud." Paternity fraud experts, including Carnell Smith and Dianna Thompson, along with several victims have come together to tell their stories and to offer advice for anyone who has been affected by paternity fraud as well as anyone who is interested in learning more about paternity fraud and its consequences throughout society. The official video will be released January, 2018. Please subscribe to be the first to witness the uncovering of these stories of paternity fraud previously hidden from public view and understanding.'

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Story here. Excerpt:

'Iceland has taken a big step in its attempt to close the gender pay gap by making illegal to pay women less than men for the same job. All companies and government agencies with more than 25 employees must now obtain an official certification to show that they give equal pay for work of equal value. Otherwise, they risk being fined.

Iceland's parliament, which is about 50 percent female, announced the legislation in March 2017, on International Women's day. It went into effect on Jan. 1.'

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Article here. Some false information here but at least the question is being raised. Tough luck bitches. Excerpt:

'Phil was a great dad, but it wasn’t like he had sacrificed his career to take care of the children and domestic work. “He’s been working part time so he can do other things for his career,” she said. Meanwhile, they—she—paid for a part-time cleaning lady and full-time child care. “So that he could pursue his hopes and dreams,” she said.

While Andrea felt empathetic toward her ex—she still, despite everything, wanted him to be happy—there were practical concerns. For starters, she couldn’t afford to support two households in New York City.

And there was another uncomfortable thought roiling in the back of her mind: a sense that “if the roles were reversed” and she were in Phil’s shoes, if she were the lower-earning spouse, she might feel differently about the situation. “I feel so conflicted,” she told me. “On the one hand, I want to be like, ‘Sorry, it’s not my job anymore to support your lifestyle.’ On the other hand, if a man was speaking of his wife that way, we’d be like, ‘What an asshole.’”

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Article here. Excerpt:

'The victims of sexual harassment who have recently come forward are far from alone: Nearly half of women say they have experienced some form of it at work at least once in their careers. But there has been little research about those responsible.

In a new survey, about a third of men said they had done something at work within the past year that would qualify as objectionable behavior or sexual harassment.
...
In separate, smaller surveys, women were only somewhat less likely than men to admit to harassing behavior, even though men, in polls and in formal complaints, are far less likely to say they’ve been sexually harassed. It could be that men and women see the same behavior in different ways.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'A man who spent more than three years in prison on a rape conviction has been freed after a family member found deleted Facebook messages that proved his innocence.

Danny Kay, 26, of Derby in England, had been jailed in 2013 after a woman accused him of rape following a sexual encounter the year before, according to local media. Key to his conviction were Facebook messages that appeared to show him apologizing for sex without the woman’s consent.

It turned out the woman had selectively deleted messages in an apparent effort to prove her version of the story. It was only when Kay’s sister-in-law Sarah Maddison found an archived version of the messages on his Facebook account that he was able to get the conviction overturned.

England’s Court of Appeal in London ruled that police relied on an “edited and misleading” account of the Facebook conversation that was given to them by the complainant in the weeks after she claimed she was raped by Kay, the Daily Mail reported.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'In a recent interview with Spiked Review, Christina Hoff Sommers said feminism has officially gone off the rails in the age of Trump. "It's all quite absurd," said the American Enterprise Institute resident scholar. "This is not how men came to power. These are antics that reinforce some of the worst stereotypes about women. And it’s just going to isolate the movement and not make it more attractive."

In the interview, Hoff Sommers, host of "The Factual Feminist" and author of multiple leftist myth-busting studies, addressed both the roots and results of the panic-stricken "resistance" brand of feminism and the social justice Left's "intersectionality" movement. Asked why she thinks feminism dominated the headlines this year, Hoff Sommers said the election of Donald Trump certainly "had a lot to do with it." No fan of Trump, whom she described as "problematic," Hoff Sommers said that, nonetheless, leftist feminists have embarrassed themselves in their response to him.

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Link here. Excerpt:

'Our Mile End office are currently seeking 3 candidates Two males for the STREET SERVICES TEAM and One female for the Cleansing team.
...
STREET SERVICES (MALE REQUIRED)

The work consists of cleaning of footpaths, use of blower, running behind the garbage truck, litter pick up, emptying of bins and other duties as requested.

We are looking to hear from anyone who has the following skills

Fit and healthy and able to run behind garbage truck
Truck Licence advantageous
Reliable car and drivers licence
Able to work from 4am - 1pm Monday to Friday'

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Article here. Jump the paywall by Googling the title of this story. The article is on the independent.ie site. Excerpt:

'Music, along with so much else of popular culture, has become feminised. For good or bad? That's a matter for the individual ear and eye, because popular music has always been as much about the visual impact as the notes.

What's fascinating is the speed with which Bono was shot down for, so the accusation went, promoting male privilege.

Rather than listening to what he had to say, then mulling it over, the attackers burst in, all guns blazing.
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Saying that "young male anger" struggles to find an outlet in modern music is not the same as saying that female anger either does not exist or does not matter.
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But there was still something disturbing about the speed with which Bono was shot down. This is why it's hard for men to talk about the things which matter to them. As soon as they do, they're accused of heartlessly elevating their own fetishes above women. Of luxuriating in patriarchal privilege.

It's rare now to see the word "masculinity" written down without it being preceded by that loaded qualifier "toxic".
...

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Article here. In time for the gift-giving season. Well, almost. Excerpt:

'Look out, progressives: New research has determined there are “robust sex differences” in boys’ and girls’ choices of toys “across a range of ages, time periods, countries, and settings.”

According to a report PsyPost, the University College London’s Institute for Women’s Health research found that children “overwhelmingly chose to play with toys typed to their gender,” throwing a monkey wrench into the beliefs of those who say gender is merely a “social construct.”

The study said sex differences in toy preferences held true even after accounting for the effects of “the presence or absence of an adult, the study setting, the gender equality status of the country, year of publication, and presence of gender‐neutral toys.”'

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Article here. "Go look at postcards in the library, kids" = "Go watch porn, buhhh ha ha ha haaa!". Excerpt:

'Lincoln Elementary School art teacher Mateo Rueda had no idea what was in store for his career when he wrapped up a lesson Dec. 4 by telling students to look through some art postcards in the classroom library for examples of color usage in notable paintings.

The cards, which were part of an educational package called “The Art Box” produced by Phaidon publishing, were placed in the library before Rueda began working at the Hyrum school. He knew the set portrayed a wide variety of classic artworks, but he has since said he was not aware that three or four of the 100 pieces featured in the box showed nudity.

Before the week was out, Rueda would find himself at the center of a controversy at the school, would be contacted by police after someone filed a classroom pornography complaint against him, and would eventually be out of a job.

The situation came to light Wednesday when The Herald Journal published a letter from the mother of one of Rueda’s students complaining about the art teacher’s dismissal and praising his work with students.
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Rueda, a native of Colombia, came to Cache Valley to earn a master’s degree in fine art at Utah State University, and in his six years here he’s made a mark on the community through several well-received painting exhibits and his contacts with area businesses.

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Article here. Saw this was in the NYT and knew already what it'd say: "Yes, men take out trash, and that is as it should be. Now serve me further, husband-slave." Predictable yet comical at the same time. Excerpt:

'This is our weekly ritual. There’s no acknowledgment of the obvious inequity. No you-do-it-next-time admonishment. He accepts his role without a hint of bitterness. (In a way I do not when it comes to, say, driving car pool or coordinating play dates.) Every Monday around 9 p.m., I feel a tinge of guilt, except … not really.

Almost every woman I know who lives with a man shirks this chore. It’s as if all hard-won equality in the home is tossed on trash night. It may be the last bastion of accepted 1950s behavior. And in this case — and this case alone — women are fine with that.

As one friend pointed out: “Women deal with the rest of the garbage.”

For many, it’s the simple ick factor. “I don’t do trash juices,” said Gabriela Herman, 36, a photographer who lives with her husband and 17-month-old daughter in a brownstone in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn.

“Ew, it’s the actual bins,” said Ashita Trika, 39, a senior product manager with an M.B.A. who lives in a single-family home in San Francisco with her three children and husband, Noble Athimattathil. “I have no idea what he does, I just know it gets done,” she said of the garbage procedure. “Sometimes I’ll see the empties on the curb — but I don’t bring them in or anything. Noble owns trash end to end. He takes the mental load and the physical load. It’s freeing.”'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'HuffPost editor Emily McCombs tweeted Friday about her desire to “kill all men” as part of her New Year’s Resolutions.

New Year’s resolutions:
1. Cultivate female friendships
2. Band together to kill all men

— Emily McCombs (@msemilymccombs) December 29, 2017

McCombs, who serves as the “Editorial Director of Parents” for HuffPo, previously wrote an article in November titled, “I Don’t Know If I Can Raise A Good Man.”

In the post, she talks about her own son, saying, “(o)f course, we all want to raise feminist sons. I wrote an article a few months ago detailing the ways I try to do just that. But my efforts are starting to seem like grains of sand against a steady wave-crash of misogyny and rape culture.”'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'What, then, was it? What system of power was Brown facilitating and participating in? Why could she not name it? And what are the implications of these questions for social research, social policy, social services and Social Work—and for our men, boys, families, communities and nation?

Social Constructionism teaches that what we perceive as reality is regulated and mediated through language, idioms, memes, narratives and other linguistic and shared literary devices that contain and convey our prevailing cultural assumptions. “Patriarchy” is a good example. That single word packs a tremendous cognitive and emotional payload. By its very utterance it sets conversations on edge. Patriarchy must exist because it has a name.

American philosopher Susanne K. Langer observed that “[T]he notion of giving something a name is the vastest generative idea that ever was conceived; its influence might well transform the entire mode of living and feeling, in the whole species, within a few generations.” Langer thus suggests that naming the unnamed can be prelude to analysis, discussion and change.

We might infer that the lack of a name for something serves only the purposes of those who benefit from keeping that thing just as it is—vaguely if at all recognized, poorly understood, seldom and only elementally discussed, with every conversation about that thing having to start from a blank slate. Keeping something nameless may be the surest, easiest way to protect it from change, redress or focused attention by a collective effort to solve the problems it causes.'

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Video here. NSFW, but so watchable. This girl takes down feminist objections to sexbots like a pro.

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Though millions of Americans begin their day with a cup of coffee, few stop to think about how the beverage got to their hands in the first place. One female-driven coffee brand is working hard to change this norm by spotlighting the women who largely bring the must-have drink from plant to cup.

City Girl Coffee is perhaps the nation’s only coffee company to use beans exclusively from farms and co-ops owned or run by women, and founder Alyza Bohbot couldn’t be prouder. The second-generation coffee roaster from Minnesota told the New York Times in a Dec. 20 interview that she was inspired to create the trailblazing brand after attending an International Women’s Coffee Alliance (IWCA) event in 2015.

Hearing the story of a Colombian widow who was forbidden from keeping keep her family coffee farm because of her gender, Bohbot felt obliged to make a crusade against such unjust industry norms. Across the globe, women are responsible for getting a whopping 70 percent of coffee to market, the International Trade Center reports, and many have little control over their livelihood.

Though the process of purchasing coffee beans exclusively from female growers “adds a whole other layer of stress on our company,” Bohbot wouldn’t have it any other way. City Girl Coffee further empowers women in the java business by donating 5 percent of all profits to that support the women in their nation of origin.'

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