Article here. The CCTV footage would have come out in discovery before the trial. Why did this even make it to trial? Excerpt:

'Security footage from a local nightclub and a college dormitory has cleared a University ofCalifornia student of rape.

Arman Premjee, 20, was accused of sexually assaulting a 19-year-old fellow student in her dorm room after meeting at Banditos Taco & Tequila in Los Angeles on April 1.

However, the security footage showed her kissing Premjee, leading him out of the nightclub and making obscene sexual gestures.

Premjee, who had maintained his innocence since being accused, said the woman, who has not been named, wanted to leave the club where they met and have sex with him.
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After seeing the video, a Los Angeles Superior Court judge dismissed the case on Tuesday saying: 'I believe there was consent. There is a very strong indication that the alleged victim in this case was the initiator.'

USC is reportedly conducting its own investigation and Premjee could still be expelled.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'A CAFE is making waves after it began charging blokes more money in a bid to close the gender pay gap.

The feminist vegan owner of Handsome Her eatery in Melbourne, Australia, is making them pay an 18 per cent “man tax” as well as giving women priority over seating.

Owner Alex O’Brien told Broadsheet website: “I do want people to think about it, because we’ve had this (pay discrepancy) for decades and decades and we’re bringing it to the forefront of people’s minds.

“I like that it is making men stop and question their privilege a little bit.”

Ms O’Brien says the response from her customers has been positive, with one man even donating $50 (£30) to the cause.

She said: “There’s been nothing but positivity from everyone, males and females.”'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'A 38-year-old man, who spent two years in jail on charges of raping his friend's 10-year-old daughter, has now been acquitted by a Protection of Children from Sexual Offences (POCSO) Act court after the minor did not testify before the court. The child's father admitted that he had falsely implicated him at the behest of his landlady who had a dispute with the accused.

In a detailed judgement copy, the court accepted the father's deposition without questions and instead said, "In the matter, the star and prime witness for the prosecution was the victim minor. But she is not examined by the prosecution and the reason is best known to the prosecution itself. The non-examination of the victim in this matter is fatal to the case of prosecution."

The father had registered the complaint on May 11, 2015. He told the cops that the previous evening the accused came to his house. The father said that while he had to leave for work, the accused informed him that he was going to stay back and rest for a while. The child was alone at home with him. The father further stated that around 9pm he returned to the house as he was feeling unwell. He noticed that his daughter was weeping. The father said that when he asked for the reason, the child told him that the accused had sexually assaulted her. However, when the landlady heard the screams she came to the house and knocked the door. The child then told her that the accused opened the door and fled.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Police constable facing rape charges after he breaks the promise of marriage. 8 years love story of a techie and a police constable has taken a sad turn as the girl lodged a complaint against her boyfriend alleging him of physical abuse with a false promise of marriage. The police constable is facing the charges of rape and cheating.

K Nagarjuna (27) a native of Kornepadu village under Vatticherukuru mandal in Guntur district. The girl also belonged to the same village and both have become friends around 8 years ago. They became closer to each other and even planned to get married according to the complaint lodged by the girl.

She alleged in her complaint that Nagarjuna promised to marry her and abused physically till a year ago. Suddenly he dumped and avoiding even to speak to her since one year. She also alleged that he is trying to get married to another girl. After several attempts in vain to convince him for marriage, she finally lodged a complaint with the police on Wednesday.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Ingram is part of a bigger movement of young women who are willing to take the law into their own hands in sexual assault cases.

Despite police warnings that public shaming could backfire, women across Australia are joining private Facebook groups that share stories about which men to avoid.

"I'm a part of the secret underground feminist mafia that tells all of my friends, and even just women I meet ... about who the bad guys are, who the rapists are," said Anna, a member of one group like this.

Anna said she could think of five men she regularly told her friends to avoid. Even within the last month, she said, she'd cut a man out of her social circle after hearing about his ugly history.
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Some described Ingram's move to go public as vigilantism. She doesn't totally disagree.

"It's almost like taking back the power, taking back whatever you can, to put against the system that isn't working," she said. "It's like a little act of power and resistance."

This reasoning troubles Detective Superintendent Linda Howlett, who heads the New South Wales sex crimes squad. At the end of the day, she said, it would not help get an offender arrested or charged.'

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Article here. Sounds to me like the lesson she wanted to teach them was being male in the presence of drunk women is hazardous for their health. Excerpt:

'A recruitment boss launched a vicious attack on two men armed with a broken wine glass 'to teach them a lesson'.

Lynn Tonks, 50, had been well-regarded by colleagues at Blue Arrow Recruitment in Bristol and was known for her charity work.
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Bristol Crown Court heard how she was drunk at the New Moon pub when she decided a man who was with two friends had given her a 'dirty look'.

First she walked up to Simon Dove and slapped him hard in the face, a jury heard.

The men remonstrated with her but then decided to leave.

Jurors were told how Tonks was then seen to drain her glass of wine on the floor and put it in her jacket pocket.

Outside the pub, witnesses described how she held the glass as she delivered a “roundhouse” blow to the face of Ashley Williams.
...

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Article here. Excerpt:

Cassie Jaye would rather not do this interview. Nursing a head cold, she's in no mood to be grilled by yet another importunate reporter. We're sitting at a long dining table in the sun-drenched living room of high-profile psychologist Bettina Arndt, who helped organise screenings in Australia of Jaye's latest documentary film, The Red Pill, against considerable resistance.
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In June the 31-year-old San Francisco filmmaker found herself in the eye of an Australian media storm because of her controversial film, which chronicles her journey through the polarising men's rights movement. The bitter sore point seemed to be that in the course of making the documentary, she had begun questioning some of her feminist beliefs. There were cancelled screenings, angry protests and boycotts in the months before Jaye arrived, and combative interviews on The Project and Weekend Sunrise after she set down on the Gold Coast for an international conference on men's issues. (Screenings of the film went ahead in NSW, Victoria, Queensland and South Australia, and it's available online.)

With all that, Jaye also received showers of love from right-wing pundits, with Miranda Devine, Janet Albrechtsen and Andrew Bolt gallantly springing to her defence. The Red Pill is "an antidote to the vicious misandry which is now the bread and butter of feminism", Devine fulminated in her column in Sydney's The Daily Telegraph.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'A student found guilty by Cornell of sexually assaulting and retaliating against a female student could be back on campus in the fall because a judge temporarily barred the University from suspending him.

Cornell handed the male student a two-year suspension in May, and a University appeal panel upheld the punishment on Wednesday, leaving the student, who is in the Class of 2020 and is referred to as John Doe, with a notation of guilt on his transcript. The student sued Cornell the next day, arguing that the University departed from its own policies and that there was a lack of substantial evidence to find him responsible.

On Friday, Tompkins County Justice Eugene Faughnan temporarily stayed the suspension while he considers the merits of Doe’s case against Cornell.

Doe’s attorney, Alan Sash, said the judge recognized the immediacy of the case and acted quickly so that Doe could be back at school in time for the fall semester.

This suit is the second claim filed in less than four months alleging that Cornell did not act properly in a Title IX investigation.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'A female University of Southern California (USC) student is claiming that the school’s Title IX office threatened her for disavowing accusations of domestic violence.

Zoe Katz, the girlfriend of a male student whose college football career was derailed by a “rogue” Title IX office at the school, alleges that the university threatened her because she refused to say her boyfriend assaulted her. Title IX investigators insisted she must be a “battered” woman for refusing to comply, she says.
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In a two-page statement provided toThe College Fix, Katz says that the inquiry consisted of “repeated interrogations” filled with “agendas, intimidation and falsehoods.”

She called the investigation “horrible and unjust,” and noted how Boermeester was suspended from the university even before he was interviewed by a Title IX investigator.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'ROBOTS ARE COMING for our jobs—but not all of our jobs. They’re coming, in ever increasing numbers, for a certain kind of work. For farm and factory labor. For construction. For haulage. In other words, blue-collar jobs traditionally done by men.

This is why automation is so much more than an economic problem. It is a cultural problem, an identity problem, and—critically—a gender problem. Millions of men around the world are staring into the lacquered teeth of obsolescence, terrified of losing not only their security but also their source of meaning and dignity in a world that tells them that if they’re not rich, they’d better be doing something quintessentially manly for money. Otherwise they’re about as much use as a wooden coach-and-four on the freeway.

There’s hope for mankind, but it’ll be a hard sell. The way we respond to automation will depend very much on what we decide it means to be a man, or a woman, in the awkward adolescence of the 21st century.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Women spend too much time on housework relative to men, new research suggests, and it's probably dragging on U.S. productivity.

That's the first finding in this week's economic research wrap, which also looks at changes in the way women have spent their days in recent years and summarizes studies on spillovers from central bank balance-sheet normalization. Check this column each Tuesday for new and topical research from around the world.

Women have less time for on-the-job labor because they spend more time doing housework than their male counterparts — so they miss out when they're working in fields that reward long hours, based on a new National Bureau for Economic Research study. Some women shy away from jobs in fields that require long workweeks, knowing they won't have the time: a 10 percent cut in free time for women reduces their share in high-hour occupations by about 14 percent relative to men, according to the researcher's model.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Accordingly, it has become every man’s job to prove they can be trusted, in each and every interaction, day by day and case by case. In part, because so many men have behaved poorly. And so, we prove our trustworthiness by foregoing physical touch completely in any context in which even the slightestdoubt about our intentions might arise. Which, sadly, is pretty much every context we encounter.

And where does this leave men? Physically and emotionally isolated. Cut off from the deeply human physical contact that is proven to reduce stress, encourage self esteem and create community. Instead, we walk in the vast crowds of our cities alone in a desert of disconnection. Starving for physical connection.

We crave touch. We are cut off from it. The result is touch isolation.'

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One woman's take on "Dunkirk" here. No surprise, really. To expect a feminist to appreciate the silence of men and resolute determination that spells the difference between victory and defeat, life and death, is a bit much to ask. In fact I'd've been surprised at anything other than this. Still, seeing at least some number of women devalue and dismiss the experiences of men at war does have this positive effect: it diminishes the reinforcing effect that women traditionally have had on men going willingly into mass violence events that cost them life, limb, and sanity. Anything that discourages that has some virtue, in its own way. Excerpt:

'But my main issue with Dunkirk is that it's so clearly designed for men to man-out over. And look, it's not like I need every movie to have "strong female leads." Wonder Woman can probably tide me over for at least a year, and I understand that this war was dominated by brave male soldiers. I get that. But the packaging of the film, the general vibe, and the tenor of the people applauding it just screams "men-only"—and specifically seems to cater to a certain type of very pretentious man who would love nothing more than to explain to me why I'm wrong about not liking it. If this movie were a dating profile pic, it would be a swole guy at the gym who also goes to Harvard. If it was a drink it would be Stumptown coffee. If it was one of your friends, it would be the one who starts his sentences with "I get what you're saying, but..."'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'This notion that traditional male stoicism constitutes an “outmoded caricature of manhood” is a constant refrain in discussions of masculinity today. The cultural elites like the editors and contributors of Vanity Fair scorn that stereotype. The new ideal they seem to be promoting in its stead is a man narcissistically absorbed in exploring his own feelings, a man neutered of the outward-looking drive for achievement and adventure, and yes, even the capacity for violence that are part of his nature.

There is a reason that men traditionally are more emotionally reserved than women: throughout history men have been the providers and protectors, the hunters and warriors, the builders and trailblazers, and those duties demand no small measure of emotional toughness and restraint. That is no less true of life in today’s urban jungle.

In fact, at least one recent study demonstrates that emotionality may protect women from stress but does not protect men from it. Men, the study concludes, best combat stress through self-control. And frankly, no matter how loudly a minority of voices in the culture declare otherwise, most women don’t want a man who needs to be cuddled every night after work to keep it together. Women want a husband and a father for their children whom they can count on to be a pillar of strength and resilience in times of stress, emergency, and danger.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'In a series of meetings earlier this month, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos signaled strong disagreement with the Obama administration’s aggressive erosion of due process protections for college students accused of sexual assault. While deploring the horrors of the offense, DeVos added that “a system without due process protections … serves no one.”

This was a welcome change from the decrees issued by the Obama-era Office for Civil Rights (OCR), which had told colleges to avoid any due process safeguards that would “restrict or unnecessarily delay the protections provided by Title IX” to accusers. Surveying the damage to fundamental fairness from the Obama-era policies, a recent study by UCLA professor John Villasenor concluded that an innocent student has as much as a 1-in-3 chance of being found guilty by today’s campus sexual assault tribunals.
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The Obama policy proceeded from the counterfactual claim that sex crimes — which are no doubt a serious problem — were sweeping through the nation’s campuses like an epidemic. (In fact the number declined dramatically between 1997 and 2013.) With vocal support from President Obama and Vice President Biden, OCR used this myth to reinterpret the Title IX, the statute barring sex discrimination at schools that receive federal funds. The Obama-era OCR ordered universities to use the lowest possible standard of proof (preponderance of evidence, or 50.01%) and allow accusers to appeal not-guilty findings. It also discouraged colleges from allowing cross-examination of accusing students; and urged institutions to deny accused students any right to a hearing by giving all power to a single bureaucrat to act as investigator, prosecutor, judge and jury.'

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