Article here. Excerpt:

'Remember Amherst College student "John Doe," who was expelled for sexual misconduct, even though he had good reason to believe that his accuser had actually assaulted him? A judge recently blocked Doe's attempt to subpoena his female accuser's text messages on grounds that re-litigating the matter "would impose emotional and psychological trauma" on her.

Consider the implications of this decision. According to Seattle District Judge James Robart, a student who believes Amherst violated his due process rights, wrongfully expelled him, and ignored subsequent evidence that his accuser, "Sandra Jones," was the actual violator of the college's sexual misconduct policies, does not deserve the opportunity to make his case because someone else's feelings are more important.

Whatever happened to believing the victim?

The incident in question took place years ago, during the late night / early morning hours of February 4-5, 2012. Jones was Doe's girlfriend's roommate at the time. Jones went to Doe's dorm room and sexual activity ensued: Jones performed oral sex on Doe.

But Doe was blackout drunk at the time—a detail that Amherst administrators deemed "credible," on subsequent review. Of course, it's questionable whether a blackout drunk student can actually provide the level of consent that Amherst's sexual misconduct policy requires.

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Appeal hearings are underway for suspended University of Minnesota football players, KSTP reports.

A three-person panel, consisting of at least one student, selected from the Student Sexual Misconduct Subcommittee will hear the appeals from the players, some of whom were expelled, others suspended for their alleged part in what a woman claims was a sexual assault.

No criminal charges were filed against the men, but the university disciplined them under Title IX rules.

The University of Minnesota football team boycotted activities prior to their bowl game, saying the men didn’t get due process.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'The co-author of a new book about campus rape says that while the problem of sexual assault and rape on campus is real, the numbers have been inflated.

Stuart Taylor Jr., who wrote "The Campus Rape Frenzy: The Attack on Due Process at America's Universities" with KC Johnson, told CNN's Michael Smerconish that although there is a "serious rape problem on campus," the statistics are "highly misleading."

According to a large scale study by the Association of American Universities, 23% of female students have experienced some form of unwanted sexual contact while attending college.

Taylor disputes these often-cited numbers. For instance, President Obama said, while launching an awareness campaign in 2014, that one in five students will be sexually assaulted. Taylor said the figure was "absolutely false."

"Frankly I'm surprised that a man as smart as former President Obama, and as careful a politician, would say something so wildly inaccurate, something that had already been totally discredited at the time he said it," Taylor said.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'With that in mind, consider some rather stunning admissions from Morse, an expert on governmental anti-sexual assault policy who is asked here to defend extra-legal, university-based adjudication systems for sexual crimes. I have bolded the most relevant passages:

`And so, the aims of the court system are completely different than those of the campus-conduct system. A finding of responsibility on the part of the assailant in a campus-conduct system might mean that they are removed from the campus. It doesn't mean that they're going to prison, and it doesn't also prevent that individual from seeking further study elsewhere after a period of time, perhaps.

But the point about the need for federal law and regulation that is trauma-informed and fair is that it can protect the rights to all parties involved in the adjudication process following a claim. … The lower threshold as articulated in guidance in 2011 by the Office for Civil Rights provides the foundation for a likely outcome of responsibility that will protect survivors of sexual violence while still not prohibiting the individual found responsible for seeking educational opportunities later. The point of campus-adjudication processes is to affirm the rights of individuals to educational opportunities. And the reason we need federal laws and regulations to protect that structure, is that absent federal law and regulation, there isn't an established process to do that across the states.`'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Looks like there are many layers to the whole incident of singer Atif Aslam stopping his concert midway to save a girl from molestation. The boy who was alleged to misbehave with girls at the concert has now revealed his side of the story in an interview with a Pakistan daily. The boy claimed he was a student of Institute of Business Administration (IBA) and was responsible for the security management.

Sharing his side of the story and claiming that he was misjudged, the guy said he was the victim. Speaking on his responsibilities, he told it was his job to ensure people from non-VIP sections didn’t go to the VIP section. He alleged of seeing two girls accompanied by a guy, crossing the non-VIP section and surging ahead towards the stage. The IBA student said he asked them politely to either show their VIP passes or go back to their seats, whilst adding that there was a huge rush which organizers were unprepared for.

But, apparently, things took an unpleasant turn for him soon after. He said the girls started getting violent with him and the boy who was with them punched him in the face. That was exactly when Atif Aslam saw them and halted the performance to ‘rescue these girls’. He said:

'Instead of trying to understand the real story, Atif Aslam blamed me, the actual victim. Nobody listens to men in our society especially when a woman has said anything against him – it doesn’t matter true or false. When Atif Aslam said ‘rescue these girls,’ everyone thought I was molesting them and a huge mob started beating me up for no reason. I have never been beaten so badly in my entire life, and that too for just doing my job.”'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Have you noticed more and more insults and abusive verbal language being directed towards young boys recently? Paula Bolyard here at PJM has a post on Bollywood star Shah Rukh Khan, who says he will "behead his young sons if they 'mistreat' a woman":

`He's also adamant that his sons not mistreat women. "And I know that if either of my sons ever misbehaves with a woman, I’d behead him," he said. SRK didn't define what he meant by "misbehaves.'

The actor's views stem from his belief that women are superior to men. "From creating life to taking so much sh*t in your daily life and using it as your strength—the simple act of boarding a local train, being leched at, not getting a job because of your gender—it’s shocking how much a woman has to take every day," he said. "As men, we should all experience what it is like and still stay strong."

"I’d like to be a woman," SRK told Femina. "Physically, I’m not. Mentally and emotionally, I’d like to be one. Sometimes there is a part in me that when I see feminists becoming aggressive, I want to step up in their support. I don’t think women are weak but I’m the kind of guy who would take off my jacket and put it across a puddle for a woman to walk."`

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Story here. Seriously. I mean, like, seriously. Guilty, Not Guilty, Unproven, and Stupid. These are the four verdicts I'd like to see available in our courts. In this case I am not sure exactly how I'd rule. Guilty? Not Guilty By Reason of Stupidity? Or Guilty And Stupid? That last fits. Excerpt:

'An Arizona woman stabbed her boyfriend with a pair of scissors after he declined her request to engage in a threesome with a woman that the alleged assailant had met at a local dog park, police charge.

According to cops, Teresa Gillard, 42, is facing felony aggravated assault and disorderly conduct charges stemming from a confrontation earlier this month at a residence in Lake Havasu City that she shares with the victim.
...
As detailed in a police report, Gillard told cops that she wanted to invite her new female acquaintance over for a threesome, which she and the victim “have always talked about doing.” But, Gillard added, her boyfriend “did not want to have a threesome because he wasn’t feeling well.”

The couple--who have dated, on and off, since 2008--began quarreling after the threesome proposal was rejected by the victim. A verbal argument between the pair eventually turned physical, investigators allege.

As first reported in Today’s News-Herald, as the dispute escalated, Gillard allegedly stabbed the victim several times in the arm and abdomen with a pair of scissors. The man, cops say, suffered only minor lacerations during the January 12 fracas.
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Cops responded to the Lake Havasu City home after Gillard called 911 to claim that she had been beaten up by the victim. The man, however, was not charged by police.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'In India, where crimes against women are rampant, a female activist and documentary filmmaker stands out for being a rare voice for abused men. The BBC's Geeta Pandey in Delhi profiles Deepika Narayan Bhardwaj as part of a series on the Asian women likely to make the news in 2017.

India regularly gets hauled over the coals for its shabby treatment of women. And rightly so.

Every 15 minutes a rape is recorded, every five minutes an incident of domestic violence is reported, a bride is killed for dowry every 69 minutes and every year hundreds of thousands of female foetuses are aborted and infant girls are killed, leading to an appallingly skewed gender ratio. Girls and women also have to battle lifelong discrimination, prejudice, violence and neglect.

In a climate like that, 31-year-old Deepika Narayan Bhardwaj knows she sticks out like a sore thumb, but she has some questions that are reasonable enough: "Are men not vulnerable? Do they not face discrimination? Can they not be victims?"

And she goes on to add: "Just as you don't have to be a woman to fight for women, similarly, you don't have to be a man to fight for men. I don't talk about atrocities against women because there are millions who are talking about it."'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Two Rhode Island School of Design students were kicked out of Brown University’s gym for wearing midriff-baring gear, and now they’re insisting that the dress code is sexist — even though the rules are exactly the same for men as they are for women.
...
The Herald reports that although both women consider the policy to be “sexist and discriminatory towards women,” school officials have insisted that that’s not the case. In fact, Nelson Fitness Center manager Jason Bishoff told the publication that if an employee really did tell Karayiannis that the reason she had to cover up was to avoid making other people uncomfortable, then that employee simply did not understand the real reason for the rule — which he said is “to reduce skin contact with workout equipment.”

“We don’t want anybody to feel that this is targeted at them,” Bishoff said. “These rules apply to all genders, all ages, all populations.”

That’s right: According to Bishoff, the reason behind the rules is not to maximize the power of the patriarchy, but to minimize the amount of sweaty, germ-covered skin that will be touching the equipment. Still, both Dimitroff and Karayiannis insist that — gender-neutral or not — the rules are clearly rooted in a misogynistic desire to police women’s bodies.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'When it comes to dealing with sexism, women are being more outspoken than ever before. Whether you tweet out a shady experience for all your followers to read or call into the mansplaining hotline to report an incident, now is very much a “see something, say something” sort of era. If you want to know more about where sexism is happening and do your part to raise awareness, there’s a new app you need to DL. Introducing: Whistle.

Whistle is a newly released app for iPhone (and soon Android) users that enables women to anonymously identify and call out sexism over the course of their daily lives — not just at work, but while they are out, exercising, shopping and more.

How it works is super simple: Open up the app on your phone and you’ll be prompted to either “whistle” or see what women have been whistling about most recently or nearby. If you decide to send out a whistle, you first place it in one of six categories: work, public, home, school, online or in the media. From there you’ll select what type of sexism you’re experiencing. Of the 10 choices, you can pick from options like “boys club behavior” and “mansplaining.” After that, you’ll have 200 characters to explain what happened. Then, send it out to the network where other members can view and comment. If you don’t have anything to report but you want to see what sort of sexist acts are happening in your area, you can check out the “nearby” tab to view whistles that have recently been sent out in your area.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'The contentious confirmation hearing of Betsy DeVos, President Trump’s nominee for Education secretary, revealed just how difficult it will be to restore a degree of fairness in how the nation’s colleges and universities handle sexual assault allegations.

Even before the hearing commenced, Democratic senators Patty Murray of Washington and Bob Casey of Pennsylvania issued a letter wildly describing campus sexual assault as “affecting millions of college students.” (According the most recent federal Clery Act data, from 2014, there were 5,178 rape reports on campus that year.) The senators demanded the new administration retain guilt-presuming policies adopted in April 2011 by the Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR).

OCR has forced thousands of universities to change their procedures in sex cases, in each case increasing the chances of a guilty finding. These procedures include the lowest possible burden of proof (a 50.01% probability) ; a virtual ban on meaningful cross-examination, long seen by the Supreme Court as the law’s best truth-finding tool; letting accusers appeal not guilty findings, a form of double jeopardy; a process so rushed that many accused students lack time to prepare a defense; and “interim” punishments before any investigation.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'As the Trump administration begins its term in office, college leaders remain unsure about how the new White House will regulate institutions' approaches to campus sexual assault. A briefing Wednesday on Capitol Hill reflected that anxiety, with college presidents calling on institutions to continue the Obama administration’s increased focus on protecting students while urging the Trump administration to provide more clarity and to take a less adversarial stance.

“My hope is that whatever Congress or the administration does in terms of peeling back federal regulations, that the universities in this country do not step away from this issue,” said Diane Harrison, president of California State University, Northridge. “There are rumors that they’re going to lessen what we have to do. So we are potentially going to need to be far more assertive and far more vocal.”
...
College presidents at Wednesday’s briefing were in agreement that they would continue to use the preponderance of evidence standard, even if the 2011 guidance were to be reversed. The majority of colleges were already using the standard prior to the Dear Colleague letter. Alisa White, president of Austin Peay State University, in Tennessee, said the lower standard is appropriate because a campus disciplinary decision does not involve “a loss of liberty.”

“I think the preponderance of the evidence standard should be one that would stand,” White said, while adding that colleges should not rush to judgment on a student’s culpability. “It’s important to us and will be important to us regardless of what guidance and policies change.”

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Article here. Excerpt:

'It seems that feminism has taken a much more intense pendulum swing in a direction that means that I no longer feel comfortable calling myself a feminist. It’s gotten that bad. We have various feminists now calling for “the end of the patriarchy” and some others still are saying in varying states of hysteria: “I hate men!”

Many of us look at these extremes and think it’s only a few who feel this way, but tragically that side of extreme male-hating feminism is on the rise and has been for some time. It is no longer about equal pay, equal opportunity, respect and equal rights. It is now about “women first” and screw the men (not in the good way!)

A video went viral recently featuring a woman, Jenny McDermott, stating “kill all male babies.” I actually feel sorry for her.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Due process protections for the accused in campus cases alleging sexual assault have been under attack for decades. In the guise of enforcing Title IX—a 1972 federal law prohibiting educational institutions that receive federal funds from discriminating on the basis of sex—the Obama administration intensified the attack.

Restoring due process on campuses does not seem to be a top priority for President Trump and congressional Republicans. If they wish to uphold the rule of law—for men and for women—it should be.

Sexual assault is a grave crime. It ought to be promptly reported to the police. Perpetrators should be punished to the full extent of the law. But stripping the accused of due process rights—shared with those accused of murder, assault and battery, and other violent crimes—violates the promise of equality under the law and undermines the most effective means available for pursuing the truth about claims of serious criminal wrongdoing.

University administrators and professors, politicians, and many journalists who write about this issue believe that an allegedly pervasive college “rape culture” justifies university authorities taking the law into their own hands and, in righteous pursuit of the monsters roaming our campuses, sweeping the innocent away with the guilty.'

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Article here. Wisconsin Public Radio published an article about an interview with Warren Farrell. They talk a lot about MRAs as "misogynists" etc., but at least Warren is able to give a more reasonable perspective. Excerpt:

'Warren Farrell, a prominent men’s rights activist, is often cited in online forums where men complain about their legal and cultural disempowerment.

Farrell’s 1993 book "The Myth of Male Power" is considered the guiding text for these aggrieved men, a kind of male counterpart to Betty Friedan’s 1963 "The Feminine Mystique."

Parts of the men’s movement are filled with anti-feminist diatribes and denunciations against women seen as manipulative and emasculating. So it may come as a surprise to meet Farrell, a soft-spoken man in his early seventies who once worked closely with Gloria Steinem, a prominent women's rights activist.

Farrell is aware of the misogyny and violent rhetoric that ripples through the men’s rights movement, but he said there’s tremendous pain beneath this anger, pain we must acknowledge to draw out the venom of toxic masculinity from our culture. ​​​​'

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