Story here. Excerpt:

'Chelsea Mackie told officers she had been dragged down a street and had clothing ripped before she was attacked.

However, months later she admitted she had invented the claim and confessed to ripping her own clothes as part of her ruse.

The 23-year-old appeared at Aberdeen Sheriff Court yesterday.

Fiscal depute Kelly Mitchell told the court Mackie had been out with her borther [sic] and boyfriend in the city’s George Street on January 17, 2014, where they saw three men.

Mackie told her brother one of them had previously offered to sell her the date rape drug GHB, this led to a disturbance and police were called.

Officers spoke to Mackie and shortly after saw her walking behind the three men.

Mackie then turned up at a block of flats to see her mother-in-law.

Miss Mitchell said: “She heard her banging on the door, and heard the accused shouting ‘I have just been raped’. She did not believe this to be true and ignored the accused who continued to shout and swear for five minutes.”

Mackie then went outside and told a resident she had been attacked.

She claimed that one of the men had tried to rip her clothes off before raping her, while the other two men stood by.

Two of the men were cautioned, detained and interviewed, and denied raping Mackie.

It was also found there were no marks on Mackie’s clothing – which did not match her description of being dragged.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'In his Commentaries on the Laws of England, William Blackstone declared, "It is better that ten guilty persons escape, than that one innocent suffer." In an 1785 letter, Benjamin Franklin was even more exacting: "That it is better 100 guilty Persons should escape, than that one innocent Person should suffer, is a Maxim that has been long and generally approv'd, never that I know of controverted."

In 2011, the U.S. Department of Education took a different position.

That was the year the department's Office of Civil Rights sent a "dear colleague" letter reinterpreting Title IX of the Education Amendments Act of 1972. That section reads: "No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance." The OCR's letter declared that sexual assault is "a form of sex discrimination prohibited by Title IX." (Sexual violence is a great deal more than discrimination, of course, but set that aside for the moment.) Afraid of losing their federal funding, colleges then set about devising grievance procedures to address complaints of sexual harassment and sexual assault on their campuses.'

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This video tells the story. From 2016 but still very worth the watch. Description:

'Vincent's status as a woman is what makes her observations of male behavior fresh - introducing herself to some guys in a bowling league, she's touched by the ritual howyadoin', man-to-man handshake, which, "from the outside . . . had always seemed overdone to me," but from the inside strikes her as remarkably warm and inclusive, worlds away from the "fake and cold" air kisses and limp handshakes exchanged by women. But in its best moments, "Self-Made Man" transcends its premise altogether, offering not an undercover woman's take on male experience, but simply a fascinating, fly-on-the-wall look at various unglamorous male milieus that are well off the radar of most journalists and book authors.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Rebecca Solnit, a writer, culture critic and activist with a long list of books and several literary awards, is indisputably one of the intellectual matriarchs of modern American feminism. Among other things, she gets much of the credit—or blame, if you prefer—for the now-ubiquitous term “mansplaining.”
...
Solnit’s new essay collection, The Mother of All Questions—already hailed as a shining light in the post-election Dark Ages—celebrates the feminist revival that she pinpoints as starting in 2014, with the #YesAllWomen campaign in response to Elliot Rodger’s shooting spree fueled by rage at female rejection. #NotAllWomen, however, are quite as excited by a feminism that treats a mentally ill man’s homicidal rampage as emblematic of male-female relations and compares men to a bowl of M&Ms in which some are poisoned (a metaphor decried as “dehumanizing” and “morally bankrupt” when it’s Skittles and Syrian refugees). In fact, Solnit’s book is a pretty good summation of what some of us have dubbed “fauxminism”: the gender warfare, the wallowing in victimhood, the fake facts. Oh, and one of the essays in it is quite literally based on a falsehood. More on that later.

Solnit paints a hellish picture of female life under modern-day American “patriarchy”: misogyny and “rape culture” are rampant; women face constant danger of “humiliation, harm, and maybe even death” because of their gender and are silenced by everyone from GamerGate nerds to wife-beaters. The only good men are feminist allies ashamed of the horrors perpetrated by their fellow males.'

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An original piece by a MANN reader. About the author:

Tabitha Geller is a writer based in Dallas. She loves reading, writing, and skateboarding. She loves to learn new things especially when it's centered on law, technology, and medicine. Tabitha loves to share her learnings and experiences through writing.

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Article here. Excerpt:

'What I'm saying in Free Women, Free Men is that women can never be truly free until they let men too be free—which means that men have every right to determine their own identities, interests, and passions without intrusive surveillance and censorship by women with their own political agenda. For example, if there is an official Women's Center on the Yale University campus (which there is), then there should be a Men's Center too—and Yale men should be free to carry on and carouse there and say whatever the hell they want to each other, without snoops outside the door ready to report them to the totalitarian sexual harassment office.
...

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Article here. Excerpt:

'The author of a children’s coloring book has invented a character named “Toni the Tampon” to instruct children that men can menstruate.

Cass Clemmer, the author of The Adventures of Toni the Tampon, has been using her coloring book character to “destigmatize” menstruation. Now, however, she also wants to “de-gender” the female biological process and to persuade children that men get periods too.

Clemmer’s latest adventure of Toni the Tampon is one aspect of the progressive campaign to blur the differences between male and female, and to ultimately create a “genderless” society which bars the commonplace civic distinctions between biological males and biological females in a heterosexual society.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'The conversation regarding whether babies born with male genitalia should be circumcised has resurfaced recently with more urgency due to the renewed public vigor about personal bodily autonomy and consent.

It is expected that parents make most decisions regarding their child’s health and happiness during infancy. While babies are limited to crying to communicate their needs, parents are left to make major life decisions for the child that bypass the usual realm of what they should wear or what they should eat.

A parent piercing their child’s ears so they look “pretty,” for example, is a contested issue. This issue pales in comparison, however, to the irreversible practice of penile circumcision. Many are starting to see circumcision as a question of bodily autonomy and as a form of bodily mutilation. At the very least, information about the concerns of circumcision should be available to parents.

Because a child cannot give a form of consent on a permanent cosmetic procedure, the practice of penis circumcision in infancy or in childhood should be stopped.'

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Article here. Check out the comments. Excerpt:

'Circumcision is the answer, according to a team of experts at the University of Chicago.

They found the simple op made sex more enjoyable for two thirds of blokes.

The researchers were tasked with looking at a man’s sexual pleasure, and function in the bedroom – as well as the risk of injury during sex.

The 362 men taking part were quizzed six and 24 months after having their circumcision.

The researchers said: “The study confirmed men’s long-term satisfaction with the outcome of their voluntary medical male circumcision.

“It improved sexual pleasure and function for most men and significantly decreased coital injuries.”

Of the 362 circumcised men taking part, 98 per cent reported being happy with their op.

Most, 95 per cent, told researchers their female partners were satisfied after the procedure.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Feminist writer and professor of literature Ebba Witt-Brattström, who recently came second in Sweden’s “Woman of the Year 2017”, has advocated getting rid of all men on Swedish television.

Feminist Ebba Witt-Brattström claims there are far too many men on Swedish television and that not only should there be more women on programmes, but men shouldn’t be allowed on TV at all. After coming second in the Swedish woman of the year competition, the writer said she wants a “brilliant culture of women” on Swedish television in an interview with Swedish paper Expressen.

Ms. Witt-Brattström singled out Swedish painter and author Lars Lerin and musician Karl Anders “Kalle” Moraeus saying she would like to see far less of them. “We may as well remove them all,” she said referring to men on television. “We can take them all away and add a brilliant culture of women instead.”'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Salvatore says he and Guadalupe began the project assuming that the gender inversion would confirm what they’d each suspected watching the real-life debates: that Trump’s aggression—his tendency to interrupt and attack—would never be tolerated in a woman, and that Clinton’s competence and preparedness would seem even more convincing coming from a man.
...
We heard a lot of “now I understand how this happened”—meaning how Trump won the election. People got upset. There was a guy two rows in front of me who was literally holding his head in his hands, and the person with him was rubbing his back. The simplicity of Trump’s message became easier for people to hear when it was coming from a woman—that was a theme. One person said, “I’m just so struck by how precise Trump’s technique is.” Another—a musical theater composer, actually—said that Trump created “hummable lyrics,” while Clinton talked a lot, and everything she was was true and factual, but there was no “hook” to it. Another theme was about not liking either candidate—you know, “I wouldn’t vote for either one.” Someone said that Jonathan Gordon [the male Hillary Clinton] was “really punchable” because of all the smiling. And a lot of people were just very surprised by the way it upended their expectations about what they thought they would feel or experience. There was someone who described Brenda King [the female Donald Trump] as his Jewish aunt who would take care of him, even though he might not like his aunt. Someone else described her as the middle school principal who you don’t like, but you know is doing good things for you.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Sandberg also discussed the wage gap: "Even though women work more hours per day and more days per year than men, we earn only a small percentage of the world's income and own even less of the world's property."
...
It's not clear whether Sandberg is striking or taking action today. "If people want to support the strike, we support them. We support our employees' rights and freedoms to express their beliefs," Joe Benarroch, communication manager at Facebook, told CNNTech.'

---

What is the Average Hours Per Week Worked in the US?

'Gender
Men worked an average of 41.1 hours per week. Woman worked an average of 36.4 hours per week in paid employment.

Marriage
Married men worked 5.1 hours more per week than men who were never married. Married women worked 1.7 hours more than women who were never married.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Maine, Maryland and Texas lawmakers are looking to codify affirmative consent, “an extreme set of rules for engaging in sexual activity that are almost impossible to follow,” Schow says. Here are the conditions under which a student can be found at fault for not getting affirmative consent:

Not obtained at “every step” of the sexual encounter

Sexual activity after drinking any amount of alcohol

Accuser “felt pressured into having sex or was too afraid to leave”

California, Connecticut and Mississippi are looking to codify parts of the 2011 “Dear Colleague” letter from the feds, which “threatened to remove federal funding if schools didn’t comply” and incentivized false accusations, Schow says.

California: “all forms” of “sexual violence” (including rebuffed sexual requests) are harassment under Title IX

Connecticut: Multiple stats on sexual-assault reports and adjudication results, the better to shame schools with few reports or few harsh penalties on accused students

Mississippi: No right to cross-examination but a higher evidence standard (“clear and convincing”) than imposed by Obama’s department'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'I missed this news last week, but it’s certainly worth highlighting. Another college has lost another due process case after railroading a male student in a campus rape tribunal. The College Fix reprints the opinion and summarizes the case:

"San Diego State University violated “procedural fairness” by refusing to let a student accused of rape have an advocate “with the same or substantially similar skills, training and experience” as his accuser’s advocate, a California court ruled.

Judge Joel Wohlfeil ordered the university to “dissolve the finding” by Dr. Lee Mintz, who also served as the school’s investigator, that “John Doe” did not stop having sex with “Jane Roe” when she asked.

It also must take back its finding that Roe “became incapacitated” and Doe “continued to have sex with her.” Mintz characterized those findings as “sexual assault” and “rape.”"

Without getting too far into the weeds of the case, the accuser claims that she asked the accused to stop having sex with her after she says she felt sick after ingesting edible marijuana. The male student claimed the sex was over before the marijuana could have taken effect and that text messages, phone records, and a polygraph backed his version of the events.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Studies have shown that women face bias when they speak up in the workplace. Regardless of whether it's conscious or unconscious, that bias has real consequences. For instance, in a study in which Yale psychologist Victoria L. Brescoll asked male and female employees to evaluate executive performances, she found that female executives who spoke frequently were given 14% lower ratings of competence. Their chatty male peers, meanwhile, were rewarded with 10% higher ratings.

It's no wonder, then, why women on average speak less than men in meetings: These risks aren't just perceived, they're proven. The Stockholm-based design firm Doberman believes the first step toward erasing gender bias in the workplace is making it known. For that, it designed an app called GenderEQ that monitors and evaluates meetings based on voice recognition, then analyzes the data to show the percentage of time taken up by male and female speakers.
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The app does bring up a few obvious questions, though: Does grouping voices into male and female voice based on the frequency and tone reinforce certain stereotypes, even as the app seeks to do away with others? And what about people who don't identify with either symbol on the screen? "We are very aware that gender identity is a much more complex subject than this," says Lars Ericsson, head of technology at Doberman. "We don’t think that this will solve the question around gender identity or gender equality. That’s definitely an important point to make. What we hope to achieve is to raise the awareness and fuel the discussion around how we interact and behave."'

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