Article here. Excerpt:

'What undermines women and normalizes sexual violence is calling people who dispute methods of collecting crime statistics “rape apologists.” The broader and therefore more trivial the term “sexual assualt” becomes, the more it is used to delegitimize ideological opponents as inhuman monsters, the less likely rape and assault victims will be heard, believed, and able to get justice.

When a column that disparages rape but criticizes expanding its definition to include “nonconsensual touching” is suddenly a “hateful” “rape apology,” what we have here is people trying to use rape victims as a shield for advancing their political priorities. Which is despicable. Into projection much, Ultraviolet?'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'A University of Dayton student referred to in court documents as John Doe alleges he was wrongfully suspended for two years following a night of consensual sexual activity with a fellow student and athletic trainer at the university, identified only as Jane Roe.

The story is similar to dozens of others from college campuses. Two students meet at a party and engage in sexual activity. Sometime later (in this case, the next day) one of the participants (typically the woman) accuses the other of sexual assault. Police declined to press charges against the male student in this case, but a university disciplinary hearing found him responsible while ignoring his due process rights.
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Like so many other young men on college campuses, John was put through the wringer. Campus authorities ignored evidence suggesting Jane was not incapacitated at the time of the encounter and that she initiated the sexual activity. Most troubling, none of the questions John submitted to be asked of Jane or witnesses were accepted. Federal guidance suggests schools limit cross-examination during such non-judicial hearings, and Dayton allowed students to submit questions to be asked at the discretion of the hearing board.

John’s lawsuit lists all the questions he submitted. I could understand a few being determined to be irrelevant or too personal, but all of them? John wanted 27 questions asked of Jane, many with multiple parts regarding the evening in question. Some pertained to “safe words” that Jane and her roommates had agreed to use if they felt uncomfortable. According to John, Jane did not use any of these safe words. Asking why they weren’t used during an encounter in which Jane later said she was uncomfortable or afraid would be a perfectly valid line of inquiry.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Leaders of the Boy Scouts of America will take the first tentative steps Thursday toward considering whether to add more opportunities for girls in an organization that has been primarily for boys since it was founded 107 years ago, according to scouting officials.

The subject will be discussed at a meeting of chapter representatives and other leaders at the organization's headquarters in Irving, Texas, the officials said.
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Girls are currently part of four scouting programs already: Venturing and Sea Scouting, which is oriented toward outdoor activities; Exploring, a career-oriented mentoring program; and STEM, which focuses on science and math.
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Earlier this year, the National Organization for Women urged the Boy Scouts to admit girls into the entire program, supporting the efforts of a New York teenager, Sydney Ireland, to attain the rank of Eagle Scout, as her older brother did.
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A spokesman for the Girl Scouts of the USA said it could not speculate on the decisions of another organization but said their single-gender environment for girls offers unique benefits.

"Research supports our premise that many girls learn best in an all-girl, girl-led, and girl-friendly environment where their specific interests and needs are met," said Andrea Bastiani Archibald, a psychologist who helps guide the Girl Scouts.'

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Article here.

'Bulawayo police spokesperson Inspector Precious Simango has made shocking claims that all males are potential rapists.

Simango made the claim as she warned parents from leaving any girl child under the care of male relative this Easter Holidays.

"We want to reiterate that every male is a potential rapist and as such we want to urge the public not to leave the girl child under the guardianship of male relatives.

"We also want to urge the youths not to indulge in activities that may endanger their lives," Simango told state run Chronicle.

However, police have reported on several instances of women raping boys left under their care.

Scores of men have been gang raped by female sperm harvesters countrywide.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'Now that we’re at the beginning of college graduation season, I thought it would be a good time to show the updated chart above of the huge college degree gap by gender for this year’s College Class of 2017 (data here). Based on Department of Education estimates, women will earn a disproportionate share of college degrees at every level of higher education in 2017 for the eleventh straight year (since women earned a majority of doctoral degrees in 2007). Overall, women in the Class of 2017 will earn 141 college degrees at all levels for every 100 men (up from 139 last year), and there will be a 659,000 college degree gap (up from 610,000 last year) in favor of women for this year’s college graduates (2.26 million total degrees for women vs. 1.6 million total degrees for men). By level of degree, women will earn: a) 164 associate’s degrees for every 100 men, up from 154:100 last year (female majority in every year since 1978), b) 135 bachelor’s degrees for every 100 men (female majority since 1982), 140 master’s degrees for every 100 men (female majority since 1987) and 109 doctoral degrees for every 100 men, up from 106:100 last year (female majority since 2007).
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Here apparently is the standard approach to the goal of gender equity:

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Article here. Excerpt:

'It comes down to a Minnesota Title IX rule that says boys can’t be on the dance team, and since Minnesota judges were at the competition the Superior, Wisconsin team had to follow their rules.

“I was so angry, so angry because how is this possible that there’s this sort of discrimination? It’s discrimination against the males,” said Miranda Lynch, Johnson’s mother.

We spoke with Kevin Merkle, the Associate Director of the Minnesota High School Dance Team Association over the phone, he said the rule is meant to protect girls in sports.

“It precludes males from being on teams that are for females,” said Merkle.” It was brought in at the time of Title IX when girl’s athletics first started. The idea was to protect those teams, and not take opportunities from females.”

“Because of that law, it’s been on the books these years that females can participate on male teams but not vice versa,” said Merkle.

It’s a law that Johnson says is outdated, and needs to change.

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Article here. Excerpt:

'The names started appearing at the end of fall semester. Some lists had three names, others as many as 15 by the time they started cropping up in the middle of spring 2017. Students found them scrawled in black permanent marker in women’s bathroom stalls around campus.

An anonymous group, Brown Survivors Speak, claim that the people on the list committed sexual assault, and the group has made posts on its anonymous Facebook profile that suggest that the University has mishandled its role in sexual assault on campus. In a March 9 Facebook post, the group explained that it aims to empower survivors and “end sexual violence on campus.”
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Brown Survivors Speak has come under scrutiny by some of those named on the list for the group’s inability to verify the legitimacy of names submitted through the form.
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In March, a student’s name was “falsely submitted to the sexual assault outing form,” according to the March 9 post on the group’s Facebook page before the page was de-activated. The group apologized and wrote that the student’s name had been submitted by a “rape apologist,” or someone who defends rapists, and that the group had later “been made aware that (the student) could not have committed sexual violence on this campus.”'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'On April 20, The News-Letter ran a piece titled “Sexual assault at college: Confronting the rapists in our lives.” Although it is perfectly understandable where the author, a female senior undergraduate student studying International Studies, is coming from, there is a lack of some key points that provide the necessary context to fully comprehend the issue that King, the writer, brought forth.

Beginning with the study from the Bureau of Justice Statistics that she refers to in the first paragraph. King accurately states that the study “found that one in five undergraduate women will experience sexual assault while in college.” While her statement, taken straight from the study, is accurate, she continues on with, “That means you probably know someone who was raped at Hopkins. It also means you probably know a rapist.”

Now let’s look at the facts more carefully. King just extrapolated that there are rapists in our friend circles while citing a statistic that deals with sexual assault. Sexual assault is not the same thing as rape. Let’s make that quite clear. In fact, a quick check of the Bureau of Justice Statistics’ website will show a well-defined difference between sexual assault and rape.'

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'On the latest edition of my new podcast, The Liberty Files, I talk to Professor KC Johnson about his new book (co-authored with Stuart Taylor Jr.), The Campus Rape Frenzy: The Attack on Due Process at America’s Universities. Our colleges are in the grips of an emerging constitutional crisis, and it’s not “just” about free speech. In the name of stomping out a fictional tidal wave of campus sexual assaults, campus radicals (working with the federal Department of Education) are systematically violating the fundamental constitutional rights of college students nationwide. In the the podcast, Professor Johnson answers the key questions:
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Professor Johnson knows this topic cold, and his answers are engaging, interesting, and very alarming. Click here to listen, and please subscribe.'

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Netflix, probably for misandrist reasons, is not streaming "The Red Pill." You can put in a request for it here: https://help.netflix.com/en/titlerequest

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Article here. Excerpt:

'A public university will put employees through a sexual-assault training program devised by an organization that opposes due process for accused students in campus rape investigations.

What’s surprising is that San Diego State University is doing this to settle a lawsuit by a student who was falsely accused of rape and allegedly denied due process.

Portugal-born Francisco Sousa was expelled by SDSU after a fellow student, Alexa Romano, accused him of rape in December 2014. (Romano told NBC San Diego three months earlier she was “scared of walking alone” after two reports of sexual assault the same week.)

When administrators investigated, they refused to let Sousa provide evidence that would have likely exonerated him, including text messages, social media posts and witnesses. It also named him as a suspect in a campuswide email.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'In recent years, critics of the Obama administration's approach to sexual assault reporting have charged that colleges are denying the rights of the accused.

Conservative websites, primarily, in the last few weeks have focused two pending lawsuits against universities. The suits say that after allegedly bungled investigations into sexual assault accusations under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, a University of Texas at Arlington student killed himself and a Cornell University student attempted to do so.

These two cases, among others, have been held up as examples of a flawed system that some say should require colleges to rely on a higher standard of evidence in investigating and punishing students for rape.

Advocates for sexual assault prevention in interviews expressed satisfaction with the current federal Title IX guidelines, and instead called for institutions that fumble with their procedures to be better versed and trained in the expectations, but said the federal guidance shouldn’t be scrapped.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'A male Lynn University student has settled with the Florida school after he was suspended for a year over a sexual assault accusation local police ultimately determined was “unfounded.”

The details of the settlement, like so many in such cases, are confidential. The student, identified in court documents simply as John Doe, filed his lawsuit against the university on May 27, 2016. Lynn attempted to get the lawsuit dismissed, but Judge Robin Rosenberg denied the university’s motion, stating that the student “sufficiently alleged causal connection between allegedly erroneous outcome in disciplinary proceedings and gender bias on part of university.” The judge also accepted his breach of contract claim.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'The tone at the outset seemed friendly enough, but the underlying message was unmistakably coercive.

In April 2011, the federal Department of Education wrote to colleges and universities to tell them they would be held to account if they failed to crack down on sexual assaults.

So far, so good. But in what has become known as the “Dear Colleague" letter, the department’s Office of Civil Rights set new standards for adjudicating sexual-assault cases that stripped many traditional legal protections from the accused. Universities that failed to move aggressively faced the loss of federal money and the public shaming ritual of being placed on a list of institutions under investigation by the department.
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Now, it seems as if a pullback by the Office of Civil Rights is in the offing. Late last month, President Trump signed an executive order calling for a review of Obama-era rules at the agency. Most close observers of the debate over the Obama administration’s campus sexual-assault guidelines believe the rules will come under scrutiny and likely will be changed.'

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Article here. Excerpt:

'William Shatner is under fire for offering some mild criticism of contemporary feminism.

"Feminism is great," he tweeted on Monday, "but terms like toxic masculinity are degrading. It borders on that imaginary concept to feminists: misandry."

For sharing that reasonable perspective, Shatner was hit with a 1,300-word rebuttal in The Mary Sue, and compared to "men's rights activists" in Mic.

"When Shatner brings up misandry as if it's in any way the same as misogyny and deserves the same level of scrutiny," The Mary Sue writer declared, "it's hugely ignorant, irresponsible, and sexist."

For his part, Shatner did not cave to the backlash. Instead, the actor doubled down in a series of tweets engaging with his detractors, insisting that misandry is a real phenomenon.'

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