AIDS.gov: "Using new media to reach women and girls"

Link here. Excerpt:

'National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NWGHAAD) is on March 10th. The goal of this annual observance day is to encourage people across the country to take action to address HIV/AIDS and raise awareness of its impact on women and girls. This year’s theme is “Share Knowledge. Take Action.” Sharing stories, photos, and resources using new media are among the ways you can take action on this important day.
...
How is the HIV community using new media to reach women and girls?

Red Pump Project: For the fifth year in a row, the “Rock the Red Pump” campaign is encouraging bloggers to add the “Rock the Red Pump” widget on their blogs and to dedicate a blog post on March 10th to the topic of HIV among women and girls. The Red Pump Project also has a photo-sharing campaign where women can upload pictures on new media sites of themselves wearing their favorite pair of red shoes.'

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Again, all well and good...

... but given that the great majority of HIV/AIDS cases are men, w/ a disproportionately high %age of male infectees being black men, you'd think the gov't would be staging "awareness campaigns" for men in general and perhaps black men in particular.

But no. It's the SSDD: It's not a problem unless it affects females.

Posted this. I suspect it will get lost in moderation, as usual

If "In 2011, women and adolescent girls (aged 13 and older) accounted for 21% of the estimated new diagnoses of HIV", why is it so important to exclude men from this campaign? why is the demographic that makes up almost 80% of those infected not important enough to be included here? Is there an equivalent men's day? And if so, when is it? If not, why are men so casually tossed aside when they make up the vast majority of those infected? Is it because the infection rate for women increased from a number less than 21% up to 21%? And if this is the case, why is that, is it because more women are getting infected, or less men? And why is equal outcomes in this case a problem? Does equality only matter when it's a positive for women?